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I have some code that looks like this:

PREFIX = "/abc/123"

@app.route(PREFIX + "/")
def index_page():
  return "This is a website about burritos"

@app.route(PREFIX + "/about")
def about_page():
  return "This is a website about burritos"

Is there a way to automatically add that prefix? Something like this would be lovely:

app.register_prefix("/abc/123")
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up vote 28 down vote accepted

Assuming that you are going to run this application inside of a WSGI container (mod_wsgi, uwsgi, gunicorn, etc) and you'll be mounting this application inside of it at that prefix, all you need to do is set your APPLICATION_ROOT config value to your prefix:

app.config["APPLICATION_ROOT"] = "/abc/123"

@app.route("/")
def index():
    return "The URL for this page is {}".format(url_for("index"))

# Will return "The URL for this page is /abc/123/"

This simply limit Flask's session cookie to that URL prefix. Everything else will be automatically handled for you by Flask and Werkzeug's excellent WSGI handling capabilities.

If you are not sure what the first paragraph means, take a look at this example application with Flask mounted inside of it:

from flask import Flask, url_for
from werkzeug.serving import run_simple
from werkzeug.wsgi import DispatcherMiddleware

app = Flask(__name__)
app.config['APPLICATION_ROOT'] = '/abc/123'

@app.route('/')
def index():
    return 'The URL for this page is {}'.format(url_for('index'))

def simple(env, resp):
    resp(b'200 OK', [(b'Content-Type', b'text/plain')])
    return [b'Hello WSGI World']

app.wsgi_app = DispatcherMiddleware(simple, {'/abc/123': app.wsgi_app})

if __name__ == '__main__':
    app.run('localhost', 5000)

If, on the other hand, you will be running this at the root of its WSGI container and simply proxying requests that match that prefix to it then you will want to use a Blueprint, as Miguel points out in his answer.

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4  
This doesn't work as of today (May 13, 2014) in the development version of flask and 10.0+. (Your index page gives the URL for this page is /). I'm not sure if this was unintended behavior (it doesn't look like it was, since it is still in the flask unit tests) – jknupp May 13 '14 at 19:47
    
@jknupp - looking at flask.Flask#create_url_adapter and werkzeug.routing.Map#bind_to_environ it looks like it should work - how were you running the code? (The app actually needs to be mounted on the sub-path in a WSGI environment for url_for to return the expected value.) – Sean Vieira May 13 '14 at 20:15
    
I ran exactly what you wrote, but added app = Flask(name) and app.run(debug=True) – jknupp May 15 '14 at 16:22
3  
@jknupp - that is the problem - you'll need to actually mount the application as a sub-part of a larger application (anything that speaks WSGI will do). I've whipped up an example gist and updated my answer to make it clearer that I'm assuming a sub-mounted WSGI environment, not a stand-alone WSGI environment behind a proxy which is only forwarding sub-path requests. – Sean Vieira May 16 '14 at 5:04
1  
@Justin you don't need to override either of those things, you need to point Gunicorn at the DispatcherMiddleware instance. – davidism Sep 23 '15 at 22:50

You can put your routes in a blueprint:

bp = Blueprint('burritos', __name__,
                        template_folder='templates')

@bp.route("/")
def index_page():
  return "This is a website about burritos"

@bp.route("/about")
def about_page():
  return "This is a website about burritos"

Then you register the blueprint with the application using a prefix:

app = Flask(__name__)
app.register_blueprint(bp, url_prefix='/abc/123')
share|improve this answer
    
Hi Miguel; do you know the difference between registering a url_prefix for a blueprint as you did below with app.register_blueprint and between registering it when you instantiate the Blueprint object above, by passing url_prefix='/abc/123? Thank you! – aralar Dec 26 '14 at 21:22
    
The difference is that having the URL prefix in the register_blueprint call gives the application the freedom to "mount" the blueprint anywhere it wants, or even mount the same blueprint multiple times on different URLs. If you put the prefix in the blueprint itself you make it easier for the application, but you have less flexibility. – Miguel Dec 27 '14 at 1:30
    
Thank you!! That is very helpful. I was confused by the apparent redundancy but I see the trade-off between the two options. – aralar Dec 27 '14 at 1:33
    
And actually, I never tried this, but it is likely that you can combine URL prefixes both in the blueprint and the app, with the app's prefix fist, followed by the blueprint prefix. – Miguel Dec 27 '14 at 1:59

All you have to do is to write a middleware to make the following change:

  1. modify PATH_INFO to handle the prefixed url.
  2. modify SCRIPT_NAME to generate the prefixed url.

Like this:

class PrefixMiddleware(object):

    def __init__(self, app, prefix=''):
        self.app = app
        self.prefix = prefix

    def __call__(self, environ, start_response):

        if environ['PATH_INFO'].startswith(self.prefix):
            environ['PATH_INFO'] = environ['PATH_INFO'][len(self.prefix):]
            environ['SCRIPT_NAME'] = self.prefix
            return self.app(environ, start_response)
        else:
            start_response('404', [('Content-Type', 'text/plain')])
            return ["This url does not belong to the app.".encode()]

If you wrap your app with the middleware:

from flask import Flask, url_for

app = Flask(__name__)
app.debug = True
app.wsgi_app = PrefixMiddleware(app.wsgi_app, prefix='/foo')


@app.route('/bar')
def bar():
    return "The URL for this page is {}".format(url_for('bar'))


if __name__ == '__main__':
    app.run('0.0.0.0', 9010)

Visit http://localhost:9010/foo/bar,

You will get the right result: The URL for this page is /foo/bar

And don't forget to set the cookie domain if you need to.

This solution is given by Larivact's gist. The APPLICATION_ROOT is not for this job, although it looks like to be. It's really confusing.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for adding this answer. Tried the other solutions posted here, but this is the only one that worked for me. A+++I'm deployed on IIS using wfastcgi.py – Gator_Python Apr 20 at 1:12
    
"The APPLICATION_ROOT is not for this job" - this is where I was going wrong. I wish Blueprint's url_prefix parameter and APPLICATION_ROOT were combined by default, so that I could have APPLICATION_ROOT scope urls for the entire app, and url_prefix scope urls within APPLICATION_ROOT just for the individual blueprint. Sigh – Monkpit May 18 at 14:38
    
See this gist for an example of what I was trying to do using APPLICATION_ROOT. – Monkpit May 18 at 14:43

So, I believe that a valid answer to this is: the prefix should be configured in the actual server application that you use when development is completed. Apache, nginx, etc.

However, if you would like this to work during development while running the Flask app in debug, take a look at this gist.

Flask's DispatcherMiddleware to the rescue!

I'll copy the code here for posterity:

"Serve a Flask app on a sub-url during localhost development."

from flask import Flask


APPLICATION_ROOT = '/spam'


app = Flask(__name__)
app.config.from_object(__name__)  # I think this adds APPLICATION_ROOT
                                  # to the config - I'm not exactly sure how!
# alternatively:
# app.config['APPLICATION_ROOT'] = APPLICATION_ROOT


@app.route('/')
def index():
    return 'Hello, world!'


if __name__ == '__main__':
    # Relevant documents:
    # http://werkzeug.pocoo.org/docs/middlewares/
    # http://flask.pocoo.org/docs/patterns/appdispatch/
    from werkzeug.serving import run_simple
    from werkzeug.wsgi import DispatcherMiddleware
    app.config['DEBUG'] = True
    # Load a dummy app at the root URL to give 404 errors.
    # Serve app at APPLICATION_ROOT for localhost development.
    application = DispatcherMiddleware(Flask('dummy_app'), {
        app.config['APPLICATION_ROOT']: app,
    })
    run_simple('localhost', 5000, application, use_reloader=True)

Now, when running the above code as a standalone Flask app, http://localhost:5000/spam/ will display Hello, world!.

In a comment on another answer, I expressed that I wished to do something like this:

from flask import Flask, Blueprint

# Let's pretend module_blueprint defines a route, '/record/<id>/'
from some_submodule.flask import module_blueprint

app = Flask(__name__)
app.config['APPLICATION_ROOT'] = '/api'
app.register_blueprint(module_blueprint, url_prefix='/some_submodule')
app.run()

# I now would like to be able to get to my route via this url:
# http://host:8080/api/some_submodule/record/1/

Applying DispatcherMiddleware to my contrived example:

from flask import Flask, Blueprint
from flask.serving import run_simple
from flask.wsgi import DispatcherMiddleware

# Let's pretend module_blueprint defines a route, '/record/<id>/'
from some_submodule.flask import module_blueprint

app = Flask(__name__)
app.config['APPLICATION_ROOT'] = '/api'
app.register_blueprint(module_blueprint, url_prefix='/some_submodule')
application = DispatcherMiddleware(Flask('dummy_app'), {
    app.config['APPLICATION_ROOT']: app
})
run_simple('localhost', 5000, application, use_reloader=True)

# Now, this url works!
# http://host:8080/api/some_submodule/record/1/
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