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I have a python script which takes a Java jar file from my Continuous Integration Server and starts it after each build. I am getting a strange error when I attempt to run the Jar file though, "[Error 2] The system cannot find the file specified". Now this would make sense if the file I am looking to utilize was missing or I had the wrong path, but os.path.exists() returns true on the file just before the WindowsError occurs. So, I am wondering which file can't be found... perhaps some part of my startup command is being interpreted as a file argument (which would understandably be missing)? So my question is, how do I discover which file Windows is failing to find in the case of error 2?

To ensure that my issue is not related to some other error in my script, here are the relevant bits:

serverConstants.py:

import os
__author__ = 'Brendon Dugan'
serverJarName = "eloquence-server.jar"
backupJarName = "eloquence-server-backup.jar"
deployedJarName = "eloquence-server-jar-with-dependencies.jar"
serverLocation = os.path.join("C:" + os.path.sep, "eloquence-alpha")
serverFlag = "-isServer=true"
javaVariant = "javaw"
javaExecutable = os.path.join(os.environ["JAVA_HOME"], "bin", javaVariant)
serverStartCommand = ("start \"Eloquence Server\" /d" +
                      serverLocation + " \"" + javaExecutable + "\" -jar " +
                      os.path.join(serverLocation, serverJarName) + " " + serverFlag)

startServer.py:

import os
import subprocess
import traceback
import psutil

import serverConstants


def startServer(server):
    if os.path.exists(server):
        print "Server seems to exist"
        os.chdir(serverConstants.serverLocation)
        kwargs = {}
        DETACHED_PROCESS = 0x00000008
        CREATE_NEW_PROCESS_GROUP = 0x00000200
        kwargs.update(creationflags=DETACHED_PROCESS | CREATE_NEW_PROCESS_GROUP)
        try:
            print serverConstants.serverStartCommand
            print os.getcwd()
            eloquenceProcess = subprocess.Popen(serverConstants.serverStartCommand, stdout=subprocess.PIPE, stderr=subprocess.STDOUT, **kwargs)
            print eloquenceProcess.pid
            print "Server started successfully"
            return 0
        except WindowsError, error:
            print "A Windows Error Has Occurred"
            print error.strerror
            print error
    print "An error occurred while starting the server"
    return 1

if __name__ == "__main__":
    print "Preparing to start server"
    server = os.path.join(serverConstants.serverLocation, serverConstants.serverJarName)
    print server
    if startServer(server) == 0:
        exit(0)
    exit(1)

Full Program Output:

Preparing to start server
C:\eloquence-alpha\eloquence-server.jar
Server seems to exist
start "Eloquence Server" /dC:\eloquence-alpha "C:\Program Files\Java\jdk1.7.0_11\bin\javaw" -jar C:\eloquence-alpha\eloquence-server.jar -isServer=true
C:\eloquence-alpha
A Windows Error Has Occurred
The system cannot find the file specified
[Error 2] The system cannot find the file specified
An error occurred while starting the server

Process finished with exit code 1
share|improve this question
1  
start is a shell builtin. Try supplying shell=true to subprocess.Popen. See stackoverflow.com/questions/9137303/subprocess-popenstart-fails –  Steve Howard Sep 23 '13 at 20:00
    
Hmmm... interesting. The reason I chose to use "start" in the first place is that it spawns the process and then exits, something I couldn't successfully get Python to do (which was causing my CI server to hang forever on the deployment phase). I would appreciate any input you have on allowing me to start the jar file without waiting for it to exit before I return. However, you have answered my question, so if you post it as an answer I will accept it. –  Brendon Dugan Sep 23 '13 at 20:04
    
I already did that and SO decided it was too short so it magically made it a comment. ;) I honestly don't know a better way to fork a background process that lives on in Windows. –  Steve Howard Sep 23 '13 at 20:10

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