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i am looking for opinions if the following problem maybe has a better/different/common solution:


I have a database for products which contains the names of the products in english (the default language of this application) and i need translations of the names if available.

Currently i have this setup:

A product table

CREATE TABLE products
(
  id serial NOT NULL,
  "name" character varying(255) NOT NULL,
  CONSTRAINT products_pkey PRIMARY KEY (id)
)

and a product localization table

CREATE TABLE products_l10n
(
  product_id serial NOT NULL,
  "language" character(2) NOT NULL,
  "name" character varying(255) NOT NULL,
  CONSTRAINT products_l10n_pkey PRIMARY KEY (product_id, language),
  CONSTRAINT products_l10n_product_id_fkey FOREIGN KEY (product_id)
      REFERENCES products (id) MATCH SIMPLE
      ON UPDATE CASCADE ON DELETE CASCADE
)

and i use the following query to retrieve a list of localized products (german in this case) with fallback to the default english names:

SELECT p.id, COALESCE(pl.name, p.name) 
from products p LEFT 
JOIN products_l10n pl ON p.id = pl.product_id AND language = 'de';

The SQL code is in postgres dialect. Data is stored as UTF-8.

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7 Answers 7

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Looks good to me. The one thing I might change is the way you handle languages: that should probably be a separate table. Thus, you would have:

CREATE TABLE products_l10n
(
  product_id serial NOT NULL,
  language_id int NOT NULL,
  "name" character varying(255) NOT NULL,
  CONSTRAINT products_l10n_pkey PRIMARY KEY (product_id, language),
  CONSTRAINT products_l10n_product_id_fkey FOREIGN KEY (product_id)
      REFERENCES products (id) MATCH SIMPLE
      ON UPDATE CASCADE ON DELETE CASCADE
  CONSTRAINT products_l10n_language_id_fkey FOREIGN KEY (language_id)
      REFERENCES languages (id) MATCH SIMPLE
      ON UPDATE CASCADE ON DELETE CASCADE
)

CREATE TABLE languages
)
  id serial not null
  "language" character(2) NOT NULL
)

Besides that, I think you've got just about the best possible solution.

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2  
Shouldn't the database be able to optimize a character(2) field anyway as integral - because ISO 639-1 language codes are more readable compared to integers if there are problems. –  Fionn Oct 10 '08 at 0:33
    
I thought exactly the same thing. At a second glance though, using an additional layer has some advantages: it is possible to enumerate all available/configured languages (useful within the GUI), you can delete a whole language (with DB constraints) and it prevents "typos". Though the latter shouldn't matter when using 2 char codes ;) –  kazu Apr 13 at 14:57

Looks decent to me.

Obviously you should put the localized name into a Unicode column, which you could opt to put the English default into an ASCII field (assuming the database supports that). It may be best to just do Unicode throughout and "forget" about it.

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Have edited the question - data is always in Unicode (UTF-8). –  Fionn Oct 10 '08 at 0:39

Looks good - similar to my preferred localization technique - what about wide characters (Japanese)? We always used nvarchar to handle that.

What we actually found, however in our international purchasing operation, was that there was no consistency across international boundaries on products, since the suppliers in each country were different, so we internationalized/localized our interface, but the databases were completely distinct.

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Have edited the question - data is always in Unicode (UTF-8). –  Fionn Oct 10 '08 at 0:39

The only variation I can offer is that you may also want to include country/dialect possibility; eg, instead of just English (en), use English US (en-US). That way you can account for variations all the way (eg, British spellings, French Canadian probably has differences from the French spoken in France, etc).

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The only complicating factor that others have not mentioned is code sets - will you be able to handle Hebrew, Arabic, Russian, Chinese, Japanese? If everything is Unicode, you only have to worry about GB18030 (Chinese), which is (IIUC) a superset of Unicode.

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Jonathan Leffler: You could use regular Unicode Chinese, and ignore GB_18030.

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When dealing with this kind of thing, i use to build a product table containing no name at all, and a product_translation table holding only names (and more, obviously).

Then i end up with this kind of query:

SELECT 
    i.id, 
    i.price, 
    it.label 
FROM 
    items i 
    LEFT JOIN items_trans it 
        ON i.id=it.item_id AND it.lang_id=(
            SELECT lang_id
            FROM items_trans
            WHERE item_id=i.id
            ORDER BY
                (lang_id=1) DESC,
                (lang_id=0) DESC
            LIMIT 1
        )

What do you think ?

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1  
I don't like this option, because in this case you are not guaranteed to have at least a default value for the names which are not translated. –  Tengiz Mar 12 '11 at 14:09

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