Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm taking my first crack at writing some linux kernel code, and I'm hitting a weird kernel panic.

I have a linked list I am maintaining with the kernel's built-in macros (include/linux/list.h). If the list is empty, I allocate an instance of the following structure:

struct time_span
{
   struct timeval start;
   struct timeval end;
};

and point to it with a pointer called "tmp". I add tmp to the list I'm maintaining with list_add_tail().

Later, if the list is not empty (I'm trying to test with one list item to simplify debugging), I point to the first item in the list with tmp and try to print out the contents of tmp->end.tv_sec. Unfortunately, this causes a kernel panic.

tmp is not NULL (I check at run-time) and neither is "tmp->end" (I am able to print both). It's only when I try to access one of the fields in "end" that I get a kernel panic. I've never seen something like this before -- does anyone have any ideas?

Thanks for any assistance!

-------EDIT------

Code example (this lives in a function that will be called repeatedly):

// .........
struct timeval now_tv;
do_gettimeofday(&now_tv);
if(!list_empty(&(my_list.time_list)))
    {
    	tmp = list_first_entry(&(my_list.time_list), struct time_span, time_list);
    	if(tmp != NULL)
    	{
                    tmp->end.tv_sec = now_tv.tv_sec; // THIS BREAKS
                                                     // Attempting to print "tmp->end.tv_sec" also breaks.
    		tmp->end.tv_usec = now_tv.tv_usec;
    	}
    }

        // .........

    if(list_empty(&(my_list.time_list)))
        {
    	new_time_span = (struct time_span *) kmalloc(sizeof(struct time_span), GFP_KERNEL);
    	INIT_LIST_HEAD(&(new_time_span->time_list));
    	list_add_tail(&(new_time_span->time_list), &(my_list.time_list));
            do_gettimeofday(&(new_time_span->start));
    }

    // ........
share|improve this question
3  
Post some code that illustrates the problem. –  anon Dec 13 '09 at 16:21
    
Specifically, the code accessing the fields on tmp->end (and code around it). –  T.J. Crowder Dec 13 '09 at 16:22
1  
Are you checking the address of the structure on input to the list and when you get it off the list? Is my_list.time_list initialised properly? –  Tony van der Peet Dec 13 '09 at 17:36
    
Yes -- I check the value of the new_time_span's address and the address of tmp when I pull it out of the list. They appear to be the same. I call the initialize macro on the address of the head of the list, so I hope that does what I need it to. –  Zack Dec 13 '09 at 18:13

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You're missing some fundamentals about Linux linked lists. The following should change:

struct time_span
{
   struct timeval start;
   struct timeval end;
};

To:

struct time_span
{
   struct timeval start;
   struct timeval end;
   struct list_head time_list;
}

When using Linux linked lists you should put the struct list_head inside your struct that you want a list of.
In the code below, you're allocating a type struct time_span and referencing a variable named time_list inside the allocated variable new_time_span... but you haven't added that to your struct above.

// .........
struct timeval now_tv;
do_gettimeofday(&now_tv);
if(!list_empty(&(my_list.time_list)))
    {
        tmp = list_first_entry(&(my_list.time_list), struct time_span, time_list);
        if(tmp != NULL)
        {
                    tmp->end.tv_sec = now_tv.tv_sec; // THIS BREAKS
                                                     // Attempting to print "tmp->end.tv_sec" also breaks.
                tmp->end.tv_usec = now_tv.tv_usec;
        }
    }

Based on the information you've provided, I don't know why the above breaks. Maybe it's just that tmp is a pointer pointing to garbage and that's why it crashes? If you have a kernel debugger setup it's easy to verify.

        // .........

    if(list_empty(&(my_list.time_list)))
        {
        new_time_span = (struct time_span *) kmalloc(sizeof(struct time_span), GFP_KERNEL);
        INIT_LIST_HEAD(&(new_time_span->time_list));
        list_add_tail(&(new_time_span->time_list), &(my_list.time_list));
            do_gettimeofday(&(new_time_span->start));
    }

    // ........

Here are some good articles that should help:
http://kernelnewbies.org/FAQ/LinkedLists
http://sumanadak.blogspot.com/2006/09/linux-kernel-linked-list.html

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.