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I'm having an issue parsing data after reading a file. What I'm doing is reading a binary file in and need to create a list of attributes from the read file all of the data in the file is terminated with a nullbyte. What I'm trying to do is find every instance of a nullbyte terminated attribute.

essentially taking a string like "Health\x00experience\x00charactername\x00" and storing it in a list .

The real issue is I need to keep the nullbytes in tact, I just need to be able to find each instance of a nullbyte and store the data that precedes it.

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1  
As a side note, is there really a \c in the middle of that string, or is that just a typo? (In a Python literal, '\c' and '\\c' mean the same thing; in most other languages that's not true…) –  abarnert Sep 24 '13 at 0:07
    
Yeah that was a typo, corrected it in the question. –  user2806298 Sep 24 '13 at 1:51

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

While it boils down to using split('\x00') a convenience wrapper might be nice.

def readlines(f, bufsize):
    buf = ""
    data = True
    while data:
        data = f.read(bufsize)
        buf += data
        lines = buf.split('\x00')
        buf = lines.pop()
        for line in lines:
            yield line + '\x00'
    yield buf + '\x00'

then you can do something like

with open('myfile', 'rb') as f:
    mylist = [ item for item in readlines(f, 524288)

This has the added benefit of not needing to load the entire contents into memory before splitting the text.

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Thanks for the help, the issue I have though is I forgot to say in my initial question I need to keep all of the nullbyte in place, I just need to be able to take the input and find the nullbyte, sorry I didn't clarify that initially –  user2806298 Sep 24 '13 at 1:48
    
You can just add the nullbyte back, right? –  justhalf Sep 24 '13 at 1:54
    
@user2806298 Edited to keep the nullbytes in place –  kalhartt Sep 24 '13 at 2:58

Python doesn't treat NUL bytes as anything special; they're no different from spaces or commas. So, split works fine:

>>> my_string = "Health\x00experience\x00\charactername\x00"
>>> my_string.split('\x00')
['Health', 'experience', '\\charactername', '']

Note that split is treating \x00 as a separator, not a terminator, so we get an extra empty string at the end. If that's a problem, you can just slice it off:

>>> my_string.split('\x00')[:-1]
['Health', 'experience', '\\charactername']
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I forgot to say in my initial question I need to keep all of the nullbyte in place, I just need to be able to take the input and find the nullbyte, sorry I didn't clarify that initially –  user2806298 Sep 24 '13 at 1:46
    
You can just add the nullbyte back, right? –  justhalf Sep 24 '13 at 1:55
    
@user2806298: As justhalf implies, Python's str.split method doesn't have any way to keep the separators, but it's easy to just add them back on to each one. For example: [s+'\x00' for s in my_string.split('\x00')[:-1]]. –  abarnert Sep 24 '13 at 23:29

Split on null bytes; .split() returns a list:

>> print "Health\x00experience\x00\charactername\x00".split("\x00")
['Health', 'experience', '\\charactername', '']

If you know the data always ends with a null byte, you can slice the list to chop off the last empty string (like result_list[:-1]).

The odd '...\\ch... in the output is due to the \char... in the input string you gave. \c is an escape code. I assume that's just a problem in the way you pasted your example.

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Yeah the extra slash present in error I forgot to say in my initial question I need to keep all of the nullbyte in place, I just need to be able to take the input and find the nullbyte, sorry I didn't clarify that initially –  user2806298 Sep 24 '13 at 1:47
    
You can just add the nullbyte back, right? –  justhalf Sep 24 '13 at 1:55
    
@user2806298, then please edit your question to show exactly what you want to see for the example input you gave. Trying to explain it in English isn't working ;-) –  Tim Peters Sep 24 '13 at 2:03

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