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Original Question

Consider the following scenario:


public abstract class Foo
{
    public string Name { get; set; }

    public Foo()
    {
        this.Name = string.Empty;
    }
    public Foo(string name)
    {
        this.Name = name;
    }
}
public class Bar : Foo
{
    public int Amount { get; set; }

    public Bar()
        : base()
    {
        this.Amount = 0;
    }
    public Bar(string name)
        : base(name)
    {
        this.Amount = 0;
    }
    public Bar(string name, int amount) 
        : base(name)
    {
        this.Amount = amount;
    }
}

Is there any more elegant means of chaining the construction so that there is no duplication of code between them? In this example, I end up having to replicate the code to set the value of the Bar.Amount property to the value of the amount parameter in the second constructor. As the number of variables in the class increases, the permutations for construction could get quite complex. It just sort of smells funny.

I did sift through the first couple of pages of my search on this issue, but I wasn't getting specific results; sorry if this is old hat.

Thanks in advance.

UPDATE

So then I was thinking about it backwards, and the following should be my approach:


public abstract class Foo
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public string Description { get; set; }

    public Foo()
        : this(string.Empty, string.Empty) { }

    public Foo(string name)
        : this(name, string.Empty) { }

    public Foo(string name, string description)
    {
        this.Name = name;
        this.Description = description;
    }
}
public class Bar : Foo
{
    public int Amount { get; set; }
    public bool IsAwesome { get; set; }
    public string Comment { get; set; }

    public Bar()
        : this(string.Empty, string.Empty, 0, false, string.Empty) { }

    public Bar(string name)
        : this(name, string.Empty, 0, false, string.Empty) { }

    public Bar(string name, int amount)
        : this(name, string.Empty, amount, false, string.Empty) { }

    public Bar(string name, string description, int amount, bool isAwesome, string comment)
        : base(name, description)
    {
        this.Amount = amount;
        this.IsAwesome = isAwesome;
        this.Comment = comment;
    }
}

Thanks so much for the response.

share|improve this question
    
Edited to include an update reflecting what I learned. Thanks for the advice Roman Boiko. –  Superstringcheese Dec 13 '09 at 18:10
1  
Regarding your update, I'd suggest to use chaining from Mark Bayers' answer. There is less code duplication. You duplicate default values in your constructor calls. However, your code has not so deep call hierarchy (if deeper hierarchy is a problem) –  Roman D. Boiko Dec 13 '09 at 18:12
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Yes, you can call one constructor from another in C# by using the this keyword. This is often used to simulate default parameters. Example:

public class Bar : Foo
{
    public int Amount { get; set; }

    public Bar() : this(String.Empty) {}
    public Bar(string name): this(name, 0) {}
    public Bar(string name, int amount) : base(name)
    {
        this.Amount = amount;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This assigns null to Name in the case that the parameterless constructor is called whereas, based on the base class, it appears that String.Empty should be assigned to Name. –  Jason Dec 13 '09 at 17:45
    
OK, I changed it to match what he wants, but actually I think it is bad practice to use string.Empty when you actually mean null. In C# You should use null to represent that you don't know the value of a string. –  Mark Byers Dec 13 '09 at 17:57
    
@Mark Byers: I completely agree with you, but that's a separate issue. –  Jason Dec 13 '09 at 18:09
    
This is of course a very simple example. But my reasoning behind that choice is usually a defensive approach of not having to worry about NULL cropping up in something I expect to have a a type value. –  Superstringcheese Dec 13 '09 at 18:17
2  
@Superstringcheese: Yikes, that's a smell! –  Jason Dec 13 '09 at 18:23
show 8 more comments
public class Bar : Foo {
  public int Amount { get; set; } 

  public Bar() : this(null, 0) { }

  public Bar(string name) : this(name, 0) { }

  public Bar(string name, int amount) : base(name){
    this.Amount = amount;    
  }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment
public class Bar : Foo {
    public int Amount { get; set; }

    public Bar() : this(0) { }
    public Bar(int amount) : this(String.Empty, amount) { }
    public Bar(string name) : this(name, 0) { }
    public Bar(string name, int amount) : base(name) {
        this.Amount = amount;
    }
}

or

public class Bar : Foo {
    public int Amount { get; set; }

    public Bar() : this(String.Empty, 0) { }
    public Bar(string name) : this(name, 0) { }
    public Bar(string name, int amount) : base(name) {
        this.Amount = amount;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

The assumption with constructor chaining is that there is one constructor that does the real work, and other constructor chain to that one. Usually it's to set up optional parameters; the constructor that "does it all" takes the full parameter list. Other constructors have a shorter parameter list, and pass defaults when chaining.

public class Foo : Bar
{
    private bool whyFoo;

    public Foo() : this(true)
    {
    }
    public Foo(bool why) : base(why, false)
    {
        whyFoo = why;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Would the person who voted this down please explain why? It's very rude to vote down and just walk away from it. –  Cylon Cat Dec 13 '09 at 17:58
    
@Cylon Cat: probably somebody didn't like that you passed why to Bar instead of base, or assigned its value to whyFoo (why?), or provided an answer that doesn't seem to be useful. (that somebody wasn't me..:) –  Roman D. Boiko Dec 13 '09 at 18:17
    
...anyway, it would be great to build your code before posting it. –  Roman D. Boiko Dec 13 '09 at 18:18
    
Everybody makes mistakes, I do them often. But I suppose it's not a big deal to have one down-vote. –  Roman D. Boiko Dec 13 '09 at 18:20
    
I didn't downvote it either, but your inheritance is inverted from my example, and your variables are different, which makes it harder to think about in relation to my question. Additionally, you don't define Bar, so its fields are arbitrary in your example - for instance, I don't know why you're passing two boolean values to the Bar constructor. –  Superstringcheese Dec 13 '09 at 18:26
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