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I'm writing a small program for my Computing I class in which the program takes in a number of integers decided by the user and calculates the dot product. I was able to do it successfully using an iterative method, but now we also have to do it using recursion. My function to calculate dot product returns a wide range of incorrect numbers. Sometimes it will just return the value of double the product of the last two values in the arrays, when there were 4 other sets that didn't get added in. Other times, I'll have 2 arrays of 3 small numbers, and the value returned is in the 80 thousands. Here is the recursive function:

//A and B are the arrays that will be dotted together, and n is number of
//elements in each array
int dotP( int *A, int *B, int n ) {
   if( n==1 ) return A[0] * B[0] ;
   return A[n-1] * B[n-1] + dotP( &A[n-1], &B[n-1], n-1);
}
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Can you post the code that allocates the arrays A and B and calls the function? It could be that these are not being allocated properly or initialised incorrectly. –  Owen Sep 24 '13 at 2:43
    
Can you provide sample data input? –  John Smith Sep 24 '13 at 2:45
    
Did you think to try printing the numbers you are processing in the function? printf("A[0] = %d, B[0] = %d\n", A[0], B[0]); in the if code, and int dp = dotP(&A[n-1], &B[n-1], n-1); printf("A[%d] = %d, B[%d] = %d, DotProduct = %d\n", n-1, A[n-1], n-1, B[n-1], dp); return A[n-1] * B[n-1] + dp; for the 'else' part of the code. This would show you that things were going haywire. You might even have printed the arrays from element 0 to n-1 for good measure. This is the easiest way to debug if you don't have a debugger (and sometimes even if you have a debugger). –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 24 '13 at 4:34

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

What exactly happens is

A[n-1]*B[n-1] + A[n-1 + n-2]*B[n-1 + n-2]+....

It was happening because for the 2nd recursive call, you are passing n-1th element's address. When it calculates A[n-2] in the 2nd call,its pointing effectively to n-2nd element starting from n-1th element, which is 2*n-3rd from the first element of the array.

The values in the array after n are garbage (Assuming you allocated n elements or you may have allocated more than n but did not initialize them). Hence you were getting random answers. You need not pass the address of the current array element to each recursive call. You just pass first element's address which is either A or &A[0]. Then your code works fine. Here's how to do:

int dotP( int *A, int *B, int n ) {
if( n==1 ) return A[0] * B[0] ;
return A[n-1] * B[n-1] + dotP( A, B, n-1) ;
}

Since A and B are pointers already, you just pass them directly.Hope this helps.

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Your solution solved it; Thanks! –  Coach Pat Sep 24 '13 at 15:01

Not

... + dotP( &A[n-1], &B[n-1], n-1 );

but

... + dotP( &A[0], &B[0], n-1 );

since it appears you want to process the last item of the array, then pass the first (n-1) elements to the recursive call. Remember arrays are always dealt with as pointers to their first element, unless you are doing something much trickier than this.

Problem solved but, for educational purposes, try this alternative: you could process the first element and pass the rest, the "tail", which may be more pleasing to the LISP fans:

return A[0] * B[0] + dotP( &A[1], &B[1], n-1 );

Alternatively to that, you could pass A+1 instead of &A[1].

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1  
Thanks for showing the tail-recursive form. That is pleasing to more than just LISP programmers. That is the more natural form. –  paddy Sep 24 '13 at 2:48
1  
@paddy The last example isn't tail recursive. For that you need an accumulator so you get rid of the + continuation. –  Sylwester Sep 24 '13 at 7:59
1  
@DarenW and @paddy I also have the same doubt as @Sylwester. How will it support tail recursion optimization? The current stack will still have to be maintained, as we need to add the result with A[0] * B[0] –  thefourtheye Sep 24 '13 at 10:41
    
Yeah you're right. I used the wrong terminology. I meant that it is a more natural expansion to use the front element and recursively process the tail. –  paddy Sep 24 '13 at 21:36

Why don't even better use:

int dotP( int *A, int *B, int n ) 
{
   if (n) return A[0] * B[0] + dotP(A + 1, B + 1, n-1);
   else return 0;
}

or in more compact form:

int dotP(int *A, int *B, int n)
{
    if (n) return A[0] * B[0] + dotP(++A, ++B, --n);
    else return 0;
}
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