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I am wondering does length of a primary key have a non-trivial effect on performance. For example consider the following table definitions,

CREATE TABLE table1 (
    id            VARCHAR(50) PRIMARY KEY,
    first_column  VARCHAR(50)  NULL,
    second_column  VARCHAR(75)  NOT NULL
);


CREATE TABLE table2(
    id            VARCHAR(250)  PRIMARY KEY,
    first_column  VARCHAR(50)  NULL,
    second_column  VARCHAR(75)  NOT NULL
);

Does table1 performs better than table2, why?

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2  
Any particular DBMS? Also what are you using as an identifier that is even 50 characters long? –  Martin Smith Sep 24 '13 at 6:46
    
I mean no particular DBMS. But I appreciate your insights on any particular DBMS. And for the length concern, In business world, such cases are occuring somehow. –  habanoz Sep 24 '13 at 6:58
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2 Answers

In general, performance will depend more on what is stored than on the length of a varchar column. If both the varchar(50) and varchar(250) columns have a median length of 40 characters, they'll probably have similar performance.

In some dbms, the primary key is also a clustered key by default. But if your primary key is unsuitable as a clustered key, you can usually tell the dbms to not use a clustered key.

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can you Specify the data bases where Clustered index on primary key is optional ? –  Ashutosh Arya Sep 24 '13 at 7:55
    
Apart from shorter is better instinct, could you explain why shorter indices will perform better? –  habanoz Sep 24 '13 at 11:43
    
Clustered indexes are optional or non-existent in SQL Server, DB2, and Sybase ASE. PostgreSQL doesn't really have them at all; you can cluster a table according to any index (I think), but PostgreSQL doesn't maintain clustering for new rows. I think Oracle has index-organized tables instead of clustered indexes; they're optional. I'm sure there are others. –  Mike Sherrill 'Cat Recall' Sep 24 '13 at 14:13
    
Shorter indexes mean shorter seeks and less I/O. –  Mike Sherrill 'Cat Recall' Sep 24 '13 at 14:14
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yes the primary key with varchar(50) will be more efficient. as You know the primary key holds Clustered Index on it, and as soon as new record is entered in the table, the value will be arranged in clustered index internally. You will see this difference in billions of records. so its generally advised to have a natural primary key. Like id's etc.

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Ashutosh, It isn't necessarily the case that a primary key is "clustered". In SQL Server and DB2 you can cluster on any suitable set of columns (or none at all). Oracle and MySql generally use the primary key for IOT and cluster keys respectively. In all cases I believe the declared size of a varchar column is unimportant. The size of the data is what matters. –  sqlvogel Sep 24 '13 at 8:09
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