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I need to fill a byte[] with a single non-zero value. How can I do this in C# without looping through each byte in the array?

Update: The comments seem to have split this into two questions -

  1. Is there a Framework method to fill a byte[] that might be akin to memset
  2. What is the most efficient way to do it when we are dealing with a very large array?

I totally agree that using a simple loop works just fine, as Eric and others have pointed out. The point of the question was to see if I could learn something new about C# :) I think Juliet's method for a Parallel operation should be even faster than a simple loop.

Benchmarks: Thanks to Mikael Svenson: http://techmikael.blogspot.com/2009/12/filling-array-with-default-value.html

It turns out the simple for loop is the way to go unless you want to use unsafe code.

Apologies for not being clearer in my original post. Eric and Mark are both correct in their comments; need to have more focused questions for sure. Thanks for everyone's suggestions and responses.

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Note that for bytes, Mark's answer needs a slight modification. byte[] image = Enumerable.Repeat((byte)255, [....]).ToArray(); Otherwise it will assume you want int[] returned. –  Jedidja Dec 13 '09 at 20:12
1  
If you have to go the performance route I suspect using unsafe/fixed and set either an Int32 or Int64 at a time and moving the pointer would be the quickest you can achieve in c# (and using a byte for the left over bytes). –  Mikael Svenson Dec 13 '09 at 21:07
    
Good points about testing the performance. Will definitely do that :) –  Jedidja Dec 13 '09 at 21:13
8  
I see questions like this all the time on SO: "I want to do x. There's a language construct y which was specifically designed to do x. I don't want to use it." Why not? Why do you not want to use a loop? Loops were designed to solve exactly this sort of problem, so why wouldn't you use one? –  Eric Lippert Dec 14 '09 at 15:55
4  
Did some benchmarking for fun at techmikael.blogspot.com/2009/12/… –  Mikael Svenson Dec 15 '09 at 9:47
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8 Answers

You could use Enumerable.Repeat:

byte[] a = Enumerable.Repeat((byte)10, 100).ToArray();

The first parameter is the element you want repeated, and the second parameter is the number of times to repeat it.

This is OK for small arrays but you should use the looping method if you are dealing with very large arrays and performance is a concern.

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Up vote. I learned something :-) –  Cory Charlton Dec 13 '09 at 20:04
    
Thanks :) So not what I would have crossed my mind for this task.. –  Jedidja Dec 13 '09 at 20:10
18  
Note that this is going to be tens of times slower than simply writing a loop. The array in question is millions of items long; the performance concern is likely quite germane. –  Eric Lippert Dec 14 '09 at 15:57
1  
The perfomance of this code must be pretty awful, even for not so large arrays (compared to a for-loop). The ToArray extension method does not know the length of the enumeration before it enumerates it. So it's forced to reallocate the array and copy the elements many times before it's done. –  Mikael Sundberg Dec 14 '09 at 16:40
2  
Totally agree Mark and thanks for the comments. I should have been clearer from the start for my reasons behind the question. –  Jedidja Dec 15 '09 at 12:56
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A little bit late, but the following approach might be a good compromise without reverting to unsafe code. Basically it initializes the beginning of the array using a conventional loop and then reverts to Buffer.BlockCopy(), which should be as fast as you can get using a managed call.

public static void MemSet(byte[] array, byte value) {
  if (array == null) {
    throw new ArgumentNullException("array");
  }
  const int blockSize = 4096; // bigger may be better to a certain extent
  int index = 0;
  int length = Math.Min(blockSize, array.Length);
  while (index < length) {
    array[index++] = value;
  }
  length = array.Length;
  while (index < length) {
    Buffer.BlockCopy(array, 0, array, index, Math.Min(blockSize, length-index));
    index += blockSize;
  }
}
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Also a little late (well, quite a bit late actually), but it could serve as help for other users wanting to reset arrays.

Building on @Lucero's answer. Here is a faster version. It will double the number of bytes copied using Buffer.BlockCopy every iteration. Interestingly enough, it outperforms it by a factor of 10 when using relatively small arrays (1000), but the difference is not that large for larger arrays (1000000), it is always faster though. The good thing about it is that it performs well even down to small arrays. It becomes faster than the naive approach at around length = 100. For a one million element byte array, it was 43 times faster. (tested on Intel i7, .Net 2.0)

public static void MemSet(byte[] array, byte value) {
    if (array == null) {
        throw new ArgumentNullException("array");
    }

    int block = 32, index = 0;
    int length = Math.Min(block, array.Length);

    //Fill the initial array
    while (index < length) {
        array[index++] = value;
    }

    length = array.Length;
    while (index < length) {
        Buffer.BlockCopy(array, 0, array, index, Math.Min(block, length-index));
        index += block;
        block *= 2;
    }
}
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If performance is absolutely critical, then Enumerable.Repeat(n, m).ToArray() will be too slow for your needs. You might be able to crank out faster performance using PLINQ or Task Parallel Library:

using System.Threading.Tasks;

// ...

byte initialValue = 20;
byte[] data = new byte[size]
Parallel.For(0, size, index => data[index] = initialValue);
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Yes - great observation and actually we are using Parallel.For elsewhere for image processing code. –  Jedidja Dec 14 '09 at 16:42
1  
Yeah, but don't you feel dirty parallelizing initialization code?!? ;) –  kenny Mar 4 '10 at 12:30
3  
This code is incorrect as presented. The second parameter of Parallel.For is toExclusive, meaning the last byte of the array is unaltered. Change size - 1 to size. –  Eric J. Dec 31 '10 at 17:20
1  
how big size should be to make sense to parallel this initialization code? –  javapowered Dec 23 '12 at 21:13
2  
This would most likely be slower than a trivial for loop –  Kip9000 Sep 16 '13 at 17:48
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If performance is critical, you could consider using unsafe code and working directly with a pointer to the array.

Another option could be importing memset from msvcrt.dll and use that. However, the overhead from invoking that might easily be larger than the gain in speed.

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2  
Yeah, it is about 40 times faster than Repeat<> or a for-loop. –  Hans Passant Dec 13 '09 at 20:26
    
Importing memset? Interesting..will have to give that a shot. –  Jedidja Dec 13 '09 at 21:13
    
@jedidja You can find a code example here: gamedev.net/community/forums/topic.asp?topic_id=389926 –  Jan Dec 14 '09 at 0:12
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This simple implementation uses successive doubling, and performs quite well (about 3-4 times faster than the naive version according to my benchmarks):

public static void Memset<T>(T[] array, T elem) 
{
    int length = array.Length;
    if (length == 0) return;
    array[0] = elem;
    int count;
    for (count = 1; count <= length/2; count*=2)
        Array.Copy(array, 0, array, count, count);
    Array.Copy(array, 0, array, count, length - count);
}

Edit: upon reading the other answers, it seems I'm not the only one with this idea. Still, I'm leaving this here, since it's a bit cleaner and it performs on par with the others.

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I wrote a blog post about using Array.Copy this way. coding.grax.com/2011/11/… –  Grax Apr 4 at 16:01
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You could do it when you initialize the array but I don't think that's what you are asking for:

byte[] myBytes = new byte[5] { 1, 1, 1, 1, 1};
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That would be correct :) I'm working with images so the byte[] is several hundred thousand/million items large. –  Jedidja Dec 13 '09 at 20:06
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Or use P/Invoke way:

[DllImport("msvcrt.dll", 
EntryPoint = "memset", 
CallingConvention = CallingConvention.Cdecl, 
SetLastError = false)]
public static extern IntPtr MemSet(IntPtr dest, int c, int count);

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    byte[] arr = new byte[3];
    GCHandle gch = GCHandle.Alloc(arr, GCHandleType.Pinned);
    MemSet(gch.AddrOfPinnedObject(), 0x7, arr.Length); 
}
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