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I need a changing value that can be manually stepped with step() that goes back and forth a min and a max, moving by speed every step().

This is my current code:

template<typename T> struct PingPongValue {
        T value, min, max, speed, dir{1};

        PingPongValue(T mMin, T mMax, T mSpeed) 
           : value(mMin), min(mMin), max(mMax), speed(mSpeed) { }

        void step()
        {
            value += speed * dir;
                 if(value > max) { value = max; dir = -1; }
            else if(value < min) { value = min; dir = +1; }
        }
};

Example:

PingPongValue v{0, 5, 1};
v.step(); // v.value == 1
v.step(); // v.value == 2
v.step(); // v.value == 3
v.step(); // v.value == 4
v.step(); // v.value == 5
v.step(); // v.value == 4
v.step(); // v.value == 3
v.step(); // v.value == 2
// etc...

I suppose there's a mathematical way to represent this as a branchless function, but I cannot figure it out. I tried using modulo but I still need a dir variable to change step direction.

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4  
((x / 5) * 2 - 1) is -1 or 1 if x is in {0,1,2,3,4} or {5,6,7,8,9}, respectively. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Sep 24 '13 at 10:03
1  
@R.MartinhoFernandes Yup. I wish there is a generic, short and sweet solution like this. –  thefourtheye Sep 24 '13 at 10:15
    
Oh, it fails for -1, though. I can fix that, but it gets a bit more convoluted. -(((x+5)/5) % 2 * 2 - 1) does it, but now one wonders if the branch is more or less costly. (wolframalpha.com/input/…*+2+-+1%29) –  R. Martinho Fernandes Sep 24 '13 at 10:17
1  
Arghh, broken link. wolframalpha.com/input/…. Anyway, the original looks highly branch-predictable to me... –  R. Martinho Fernandes Sep 24 '13 at 10:23
    
Is arithmetic on T exact? In particular, does speed exactly divide max-min ? –  MSalters Sep 24 '13 at 11:51

7 Answers 7

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can do it with an array, something like this (WARNING: probably has off-by-one errors galore!):

int total_steps = 2*(max - min + 1)/speed; // this may be wrong -- have to double check
T steps[total_steps];
for(int i = 0; i < max - min; ++i)
    steps[total_steps - i] = steps[i] = min + i*speed;

Then you can use modulo total_steps to step through the array forever.

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Yes there are off by one errors but trying to solve them without testing would be too dangerous ;) Testing is a must in this case but of course this is up to the OP. –  leemes Sep 24 '13 at 10:31
    
Thanks, this is a good solution in my use case. If I need floating point precision I'll just use the branched version, as, according to the other answers, it's easily predictable by the CPU. –  Vittorio Romeo Sep 25 '13 at 12:34
    
@VittorioRomeo - this should work for floating point steps as well. It's basically just a mapping of 0...total_steps - 1 to min..max..min by increments (then decrements) of speed - these min, max and speed values can be double's. –  Paul Evans Sep 25 '13 at 13:01

I'm not a fan of "branchless" algorithms, as many times they're just used "because branching is slow", and in that case, IMO it's the optimizer's job to find a faster way.

Nevertheless, you could use comparisons, as bools yield either 0 or 1 when converted to an integral type. Whether that's branchless depends on the architecture AFAIK.

value += speed*dir;                           // allowing over-/underflow
value += (min-value)*(value<min) + (max-value)*(value>max);  // clamp
dir   += 2* ((value==min) - (value==max));    // set dir

SSCCE:

template<typename T> struct PingPongValue {
        T value, min, max, speed, dir{1};

        PingPongValue(T mMin, T mMax, T mSpeed) 
           : value(mMin), min(mMin), max(mMax), speed(mSpeed) { }

        void step()
        {
            // allowing over-/underflow
            value += speed*dir;

            // clamp
            value += (min-value)*(value<min) + (max-value)*(value>max);

            // set dir
            dir   += 2* ((value==min) - (value==max));
        }
};


#include <iostream>

template<class T>
void step(PingPongValue<T>& v)
{
    v.step();
    std::cout << "stepped to: " << v.value << std::endl;
}

int main()
{
    PingPongValue<int> p{-3, 6, 2};
    std::cout << "initial: " << p.value << std::endl;
    for(int i = 0; i < 10; ++i)
    {
        step(p);
    }
}

Output:

initial: -3
stepped to: -1
stepped to: 1
stepped to: 3
stepped to: 5
stepped to: 6
stepped to: 4
stepped to: 2
stepped to: 0
stepped to: -2
stepped to: -3
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Indeed, you have to employ some periodic function like sin(x) and normalize it to your desired scale. For example, Triangle wave: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triangle_wave

Another approach (maybe, more preferred for simple cases) is to use an array of pre-calculated results and iterate through them (and handle index overflow with help of mod function).

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        int min = 2;
        int max = 7;
        int step = 1;

        int d = max - min;
        int n = d;

        for( int i = 0; min<1000; ++i)
        {
            int x = min + abs(d - n); // the result
            n = (n + step) % (2 * d); // the step
        }
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Here is my idea in pseudocode, no guarantees though :) This should emulate what your example does, but not what your code does. That is, it should create a series 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1, 2, ... whereas your code would create 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1, 1, 2, ...

The comments illustrate the behaviour with min=1, max=5, speed=1

size = max-min; // 4
internalValue = (internalValue + speed) % (size*2); // 0, 1, ..., 7, 0, 1, ...
reverse = internalValue / size; // 0 for internalValue in [0, 3], 1 for [4, 7]
value = min + internalValue - 2*reverse*(internalValue - size);

internalValue is the only actual state variable here.

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Let's assume you are trying to ping-pong between 6 and 11:

You are trying to repeat the following sequence:

f4(i) = 6 7 8 9 10 11 10 9 8 7

Suppose it's formed by adding 6 to the values of another sequence :

f3(i) = 0 1 2 3 4 5 4 3 2 1

Suppose it's formed by taking the absolute value of another sequence.

f2(i) = 0 1 2 3 4 5 -4 -3 -2 -1

Suppose now that you got these numbers by substracting 4 from the values of another sequence.

f1(i) = 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3

Then you have:

f1(i) = (i + 4) % 10;
f2(i) = f1(i) - 4;
f3(i) = abs(f2(i));
f4(i) = f3(i) + 6

Replace:

min = 6
2*(max - min) = 10
max - min - 1 = 4

You get:

f1(i) = (i + max - min - 1) % 2*(max - min);
f2(i) = f1(i) - (max - min - 1);
f3(i) = abs(f2(i));
f4(i) = f3(i) + min;
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If you have a branchless abs-function, you can use this:

template<typename T> struct PingPongValue {
    T value, inner, min, max, speed;

    PingPongValue(T mMin, T mMax, T mSpeed) 
       : value(mMin), inner(0), min(mMin), max(mMax), speed(mSpeed) { }

    void step()
    {
        inner = (inner + speed) % ((mMax - mMin) * 2);
        value = mMax - abs(inner - mMax + 1) + mMin - 1;
    }
};
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