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Consider following scenario:

  1. I checked out a branch from master
  2. I made some commits
  3. I merged updated master
  4. I made some more commits
  5. Now I want rebase commits from point 4 so that commits from point 2 are not affected.

So if I have initially:

     (1)         (2)
x--x--x--x--x--x--x         master
       \     \
        y--y--Y--y--y       dev
          (2)(3)   (4)

I want to get:

     (1)         (2)
x--x--x--x--x--x--x             master
       \           \
        y--y--------Y'--y'--y'  dev
          (2)      (5)     (5)

If I just do git rebase master it will rebase commits both from 2 and from 4 and delete merge from 3. It's not what I want.

There is also option to do git merge master, then git rebase -i -p before the merge commit from 3 and move the last merge after the merge from 3 and do fixup/squash it into the merge from 3. Update: it does not work that easy. Git refuses to squash two merges. This problem: git rebase interactive: squash merge commits together .

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My answer stands (except I mistakenly reference the operation as a merge --onto: it is rebase --onto). I have update the answer to come closer to what you want. –  VonC Sep 25 '13 at 8:47
    
What error message do you get? –  VonC Sep 25 '13 at 15:20
    
Refusing to squash a merge: 987ab25995f24554cc7ce1451919327e09c5a18b –  Alexey Sep 25 '13 at 15:22
    
Ok. I guess the reset --soft mentioned in stackoverflow.com/q/1725708/6309 can help. Not sure of the exact sequence though. –  VonC Sep 25 '13 at 15:28

3 Answers 3

You start from:

     (1)
x--x--x--x--x--x--x         master
       \     \
        y--y--Y--y--y       dev
          (2)(3)   (4)

Do a git rebase --onto:

git branch dev1 Y^
git rebase --onto master Y^ dev

Y^ references the first parent of the merge commit Y: here 'y', and not 'x'.
See "Ancestry References":

The first parent is the branch you were on when you merged, and the second is the commit on the branch that you merged in.

You would end up with:

     (1)
x--x--x--x--x--x--x             master
       \           \
        y--y        Y'--y'--y'  dev
          (2)      (5)
        (dev1)

That would split your initial dev branch in two, and apply only the last dev commits on top of master, while keeping the first dev commits unchanged, now referenced by the branch dev1.

You can try a:

git rebase -p --onto master `Y^` dev

to see if that preserve the relationship between between y (that is Y^) and the newly rebased Y'. But I doubt that is possible.

-p is for --preserve-merge.

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I end up doing the following:

git rebase -i -p Y^

In the file add the following line after line with the merge (presumably after the first line):

exec sh -c "git merge master; git reset --soft HEAD^^; git rev-parse master > .git/MERGE_HEAD; git commit -C `git rev-parse HEAD`"
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I derived it from stackoverflow.com/a/4138485/126529 –  Alexey Sep 25 '13 at 22:57
    
Sound great. More precise than my answer. +1 –  VonC Sep 26 '13 at 6:09

Using my and VonC's answers made more automate-able solution:

git checkout -b tmp Y
git merge master 
git reset --soft HEAD^^ 
git rev-parse master > .git/MERGE_HEAD 
git commit -C Y
git checkout -
git rebase --onto tmp Y
git branch -d tmp

Y - is the merge commit to be extended.

And it works like this:

x--x--x--x--x--x--x         master
       \     \
        y--y--Y--y--y       dev

x--x--x--x--x--x--x         master
      |      \
       \      Y             tmp
        \    / \
         y--y   y--y        dev

x--x--x--x--x--x--x         master
      |      \     \
       \      Y-----Y'      tmp
        \    / \
         y--y   y--y        dev

x--x--x--x--x--x--x         master
      |            \
      |      -------Y'      tmp
       \    /
        y--y--Y--y--y       dev

x--x--x--x--x--x--x         master
      |            \
      |      -------Y'      tmp
       \    /        \
        y--y          y--y  dev

x--x--x--x--x--x--x           master
       \           \
        y--y--------Y'--y--y  dev
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