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I have created a dyadic verb which expects a number and a vector and returns the vector filtered to contain those which divide the number, like this:

divs =. 4 : '((=<.)y%x)#y'

So, for example, 4 divs i.20 returns 0 4 8 12 16 as expected.

Now I'd like to modify/wrap this verb so that the first argument can be a vector as well, and return either a 2-dimensional vector or a single long one. I'm interested in how to implement both. So I'd like to be able to do this:

4 5 divs2 i.20

and have my verb return:

0 4 8  16 20
0 5 10 15

or:

0 4 8 16 20 0 5 10 15

Something like map or mapcat or flatmap from FP languages. How can I achieve this?

EDIT: to be clear, I'm hoping for 2 new verbs (not a single one which can produce both results)

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I'll come back later and edit this with rationale, but just as an immediate answer, you want:

   divs2=.divs"0 1  NB. Parcel left args into scalars, right into vectors

   4 5 divs2 i.20  NB. Note fill element (trailing zero)
0 4  8 12 16
0 5 10 15  0

   divs3=.[: ; <@divs2  NB.  Like divs2, but single flat list

   4 5 divs3 i.20   NB. Note the <@ prevents the fills (no trailing zero)
0 4 8 12 16 0 5 10 15
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Smashing - I thought the answer would involve " but couldn't work it out myself. Look forward to the update. –  Matthew Gilliard Sep 24 '13 at 13:46
2  
You can use &.> (each) to prevent fills: (i.20)&(divs~) each 4 5 –  Eelvex Sep 24 '13 at 13:53

J does have an Residue primitive (|) that makes this a little simpler (it saves me from having to divide and then compare the result is an integer for identifying factors).

In Tacit form

   divt=: ((0=|)#])"0 1
   4 5 divt i. 20
0 4  8 12 16
0 5 10 15  0

In Explicit form

   divE=: 4 : '((0 = x|y) # y)'"0 1
   4 5  divE i. 20
0 4  8 12 16
0 5 10 15  0

I often find that J already has a primitive that does at least part of the work for me when I code.

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2  
Yep, and this leads nicely to a tacit formulation: divs=.] #~ 0 = | Which in turn allows you to use J's HOFs to address the original question divs2=.] #~ 0 = |/ (speaking of built-in primitives!). –  Dan Bron Sep 24 '13 at 17:01
1  
Nice use of Table adverb (/) to get around the original rank requirement Dan. To explain Table takes each item of x and applies it to y using the verb ] #~ 0 = | . Slick! –  bob Sep 24 '13 at 20:55
1  
In this specific case, the / applies only to the | (residue function). Applied to the whole verb, it would look like (] #~ 0=|)/. However, it wouldn't have the same effect: whereas |is rank zero, the verb train has unbound ("infinite") rank, which limits the utility of table. To get the right effect by modifying the entire verb, we'd have to go back to (] #~ 0=|)"0 1. Or, if we really wanted to use table, we could force the train to scalar rank first: (] #~ 0=|)"0/ . –  Dan Bron Sep 25 '13 at 12:50
    
Quite right Dan. The infinite rank of the fork is often a trap for me. Thanks for pointing out the subtlety. Your solution remains elegant. –  bob Sep 25 '13 at 15:09

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