Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

For example, a list.

l1 = [1, 5 , 7] How do I check the methods that it has?

(l1.append, for example)

Or a string... string.lower(

share|improve this question

6 Answers 6

up vote 17 down vote accepted

You can use dir to get a list the methods of any object. This is very useful in the interactive prompt:

>>> dir(l1)
['__add__', '__class__', '__contains__', '__delattr__', '__delitem__', '__delslice__', '__doc__', '__eq__',
'__ge__', '__getattribute__', '__getitem__', '__getslice__', '__gt__', '__hash__', '__iadd__', '__imul__',
'__init__', '__iter__', '__le__', '__len__', '__lt__', '__mul__', '__ne__', '__new__', '__reduce__',
'__reduce_ex__', '__repr__', '__reversed__', '__rmul__', '__setattr__', '__setitem__', '__setslice__',
'__str__', 'append', 'count', 'extend', 'index', 'insert', 'pop', 'remove', 'reverse', 'sort']

The interesting methods are usually those not starting with underscores. You can write your own version of dir that ignores names starting with underscores if you wish:

>>> mydir = lambda a:[x for x in dir(a) if not x.startswith('_')]
>>> mydir([])
['append', 'count', 'extend', 'index', 'insert', 'pop', 'remove', 'reverse', 'sort']
share|improve this answer
1  
At the very least you should use if not (x.startswith('__') and x.endswith('__')) because people often use a __ prefix to denote private members. You only want to remove ones that both start and end with __ –  Tom Dec 13 '09 at 23:24
1  
I'm just guessing here, but I think alex wants to know what is available in the public interface. –  Mark Byers Dec 13 '09 at 23:31
1  
Might be worth pointing out that dir() isn't limited to the interactive prompt (your statement can be read that way, to someone unfamiliar with it) –  Jed Smith Dec 13 '09 at 23:36
    
I've reworded it to avoid confusion. Thanks for the comment. –  Mark Byers Dec 13 '09 at 23:57
1  
@Mark Byers: Well in that case you also want to filter things that start with _. In any case... this is just a nitpick :-). Your answer still stands as good in my book, and gets the point across :-). –  Tom Dec 14 '09 at 2:22

You might want to look at the getmembers function in the inspect module

In [1]: import inspect

In [2]: inspect?
Type:   	module
Base Class: <type 'module'>
String Form:    <module 'inspect' from '/usr/lib/python2.6/inspect.pyc'>
Namespace:  Interactive
File:   	/usr/lib/python2.6/inspect.py
Docstring:
    Get useful information from live Python objects.

    This module encapsulates the interface provided by the internal special
    attributes (func_*, co_*, im_*, tb_*, etc.) in a friendlier fashion.
    It also provides some help for examining source code and class layout.

    Here are some of the useful functions provided by this module:

        ismodule(), isclass(), ismethod(), isfunction(), isgeneratorfunction(),
            isgenerator(), istraceback(), isframe(), iscode(), isbuiltin(),
            isroutine() - check object types
        getmembers() - get members of an object that satisfy a given condition

        getfile(), getsourcefile(), getsource() - find an object's source code
        getdoc(), getcomments() - get documentation on an object
        getmodule() - determine the module that an object came from
        getclasstree() - arrange classes so as to represent their hierarchy

        getargspec(), getargvalues() - get info about function arguments
        formatargspec(), formatargvalues() - format an argument spec
        getouterframes(), getinnerframes() - get info about frames
        currentframe() - get the current stack frame
        stack(), trace() - get info about frames on the stack or in a traceback

In [3]: l1=[1,5,7]

In [4]: inspect.getmembers(l1)
Out[4]: 
[('__add__', <method-wrapper '__add__' of list object at 0xa38716c>),
 ('__class__', <type 'list'>),
 ('__contains__', <method-wrapper '__contains__' of list object at 0xa38716c>),
 ('__delattr__', <method-wrapper '__delattr__' of list object at 0xa38716c>),
 ('__delitem__', <method-wrapper '__delitem__' of list object at 0xa38716c>),
 ('__delslice__', <method-wrapper '__delslice__' of list object at 0xa38716c>),
 ('__doc__',
  "list() -> new list\nlist(sequence) -> new list initialized from sequence's items"),
 ('__eq__', <method-wrapper '__eq__' of list object at 0xa38716c>),
 ('__format__', <built-in method __format__ of list object at 0xa38716c>),
 ('__ge__', <method-wrapper '__ge__' of list object at 0xa38716c>),
 ('__getattribute__',
  <method-wrapper '__getattribute__' of list object at 0xa38716c>),
 ('__getitem__', <built-in method __getitem__ of list object at 0xa38716c>),
 ('__getslice__', <method-wrapper '__getslice__' of list object at 0xa38716c>),
 ('__gt__', <method-wrapper '__gt__' of list object at 0xa38716c>),
 ('__hash__', None),
 ('__iadd__', <method-wrapper '__iadd__' of list object at 0xa38716c>),
 ('__imul__', <method-wrapper '__imul__' of list object at 0xa38716c>),
 ('__init__', <method-wrapper '__init__' of list object at 0xa38716c>),
 ('__iter__', <method-wrapper '__iter__' of list object at 0xa38716c>),
 ('__le__', <method-wrapper '__le__' of list object at 0xa38716c>),
 ('__len__', <method-wrapper '__len__' of list object at 0xa38716c>),
 ('__lt__', <method-wrapper '__lt__' of list object at 0xa38716c>),
 ('__mul__', <method-wrapper '__mul__' of list object at 0xa38716c>),
 ('__ne__', <method-wrapper '__ne__' of list object at 0xa38716c>),
 ('__new__', <built-in method __new__ of type object at 0x822be40>),
 ('__reduce__', <built-in method __reduce__ of list object at 0xa38716c>),
 ('__reduce_ex__',
  <built-in method __reduce_ex__ of list object at 0xa38716c>),
 ('__repr__', <method-wrapper '__repr__' of list object at 0xa38716c>),
 ('__reversed__', <built-in method __reversed__ of list object at 0xa38716c>),
 ('__rmul__', <method-wrapper '__rmul__' of list object at 0xa38716c>),
 ('__setattr__', <method-wrapper '__setattr__' of list object at 0xa38716c>),
 ('__setitem__', <method-wrapper '__setitem__' of list object at 0xa38716c>),
 ('__setslice__', <method-wrapper '__setslice__' of list object at 0xa38716c>),
 ('__sizeof__', <built-in method __sizeof__ of list object at 0xa38716c>),
 ('__str__', <method-wrapper '__str__' of list object at 0xa38716c>),
 ('__subclasshook__',
  <built-in method __subclasshook__ of type object at 0x822be40>),
 ('append', <built-in method append of list object at 0xa38716c>),
 ('count', <built-in method count of list object at 0xa38716c>),
 ('extend', <built-in method extend of list object at 0xa38716c>),
 ('index', <built-in method index of list object at 0xa38716c>),
 ('insert', <built-in method insert of list object at 0xa38716c>),
 ('pop', <built-in method pop of list object at 0xa38716c>),
 ('remove', <built-in method remove of list object at 0xa38716c>),
 ('reverse', <built-in method reverse of list object at 0xa38716c>),
 ('sort', <built-in method sort of list object at 0xa38716c>)]
share|improve this answer

Interactive Python has a help function you can use with anything:

>>> help(list)
Help on class list in module __builtin__:

class list(object)
 |  list() -> new list
 |  list(sequence) -> new list initialized from sequence´s items
 |
 |  Methods defined here:
 |
 |  __add__(...)
 |      x.__add__(y) <==> x+y
 |
 |  __contains__(...)
 |      x.__contains__(y) <==> y in x
 |
 |  __delitem__(...)
 |      x.__delitem__(y) <==> del x[y]
 |
 |  __delslice__(...)
 |      x.__delslice__(i, j) <==> del x[i:j]
 |
 |      Use of negative indices is not supported.
 |
 |  __eq__(...)
 |      x.__eq__(y) <==> x==y
 |
 |  __ge__(...)
 |      x.__ge__(y) <==> x>=y
 |
 |  __getattribute__(...)
 |      x.__getattribute__('name') <==> x.name
 |
 |  __getitem__(...)
 |      x.__getitem__(y) <==> x[y]
 |
 |  __getslice__(...)
 |      x.__getslice__(i, j) <==> x[i:j]
 |
 |      Use of negative indices is not supported.
 |
 |  __gt__(...)
 |      x.__gt__(y) <==> x>y
 |
 |  __iadd__(...)
 |      x.__iadd__(y) <==> x+=y
 |
 |  __imul__(...)
 |      x.__imul__(y) <==> x*=y
 |
 |  __init__(...)
 |      x.__init__(...) initializes x; see x.__class__.__doc__ for signature
 |
 |  __iter__(...)
 |      x.__iter__() <==> iter(x)
 |
 |  __le__(...)
 |      x.__le__(y) <==> x<=y
 |
 |  __len__(...)
 |      x.__len__() <==> len(x)
 |
 |  __lt__(...)
 |      x.__lt__(y) <==> x<y
 |
 |  __mul__(...)
 |      x.__mul__(n) <==> x*n
 |
 |  __ne__(...)
 |      x.__ne__(y) <==> x!=y
 |
 |  __repr__(...)
 |      x.__repr__() <==> repr(x)
 |
 |  __reversed__(...)
 |      L.__reversed__() -- return a reverse iterator over the list
 |
 |  __rmul__(...)
 |      x.__rmul__(n) <==> n*x
 |
 |  __setitem__(...)
 |      x.__setitem__(i, y) <==> x[i]=y
 |
 |  __setslice__(...)
 |      x.__setslice__(i, j, y) <==> x[i:j]=y
 |
 |      Use  of negative indices is not supported.
 |
 |  __sizeof__(...)
 |      L.__sizeof__() -- size of L in memory, in bytes
 |
 |  append(...)
 |      L.append(object) -- append object to end
 |
 |  count(...)
 |      L.count(value) -> integer -- return number of occurrences of value
 |
 |  extend(...)
 |      L.extend(iterable) -- extend list by appending elements from the iterable
 |
 |  index(...)
 |      L.index(value, [start, [stop]]) -> integer -- return first index of value.
 |      Raises ValueError if the value is not present.
 |
 |  insert(...)
 |      L.insert(index, object) -- insert object before index
 |
 |  pop(...)
 |      L.pop([index]) -> item -- remove and return item at index (default last).
 |      Raises IndexError if list is empty or index is out of range.
 |
 |  remove(...)
 |      L.remove(value) -- remove first occurrence of value.
 |      Raises ValueError if the value is not present.
 |
 |  reverse(...)
 |      L.reverse() -- reverse *IN PLACE*
 |
 |  sort(...)
 |      L.sort(cmp=None, key=None, reverse=False) -- stable sort *IN PLACE*;
 |      cmp(x, y) -> -1, 0, 1
 |
 |  ----------------------------------------------------------------------
 |  Data and other attributes defined here:
 |
 |  __hash__ = None
 |
 |  __new__ = <built-in method __new__ of type object at 0x1E1CF100>
 |      T.__new__(S, ...) -> a new object with type S, a subtype of T
share|improve this answer

As it happens, all the members of list instances are methods. If that weren't the case, you could use this:

l1 = [1, 5 , 7]
print [name for name in dir(l1) if type(getattr(l1, name) == type(l1.append))]

That will exclude members that aren't methods.

share|improve this answer
2  
or if callable(getattr(l1, name)) –  Benjamin Wohlwend Dec 13 '09 at 23:51
    
@piquadrat: Yes, nice. –  RichieHindle Dec 14 '09 at 8:24

If you install IPython, then you can do this:

% ipython
Python 2.6.4 (r264:75706, Nov  2 2009, 14:38:03) 
Type "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.

IPython 0.10 -- An enhanced Interactive Python.
?         -> Introduction and overview of IPython's features.
%quickref -> Quick reference.
help      -> Python's own help system.
object?   -> Details about 'object'. ?object also works, ?? prints more.

In [1]: l1=[1,5,7]

In [2]: l1.
l1.__add__           l1.__getslice__      l1.__new__           l1.append
l1.__class__         l1.__gt__            l1.__reduce__        l1.count
l1.__contains__      l1.__hash__          l1.__reduce_ex__     l1.extend
l1.__delattr__       l1.__iadd__          l1.__repr__          l1.index
l1.__delitem__       l1.__imul__          l1.__reversed__      l1.insert
l1.__delslice__      l1.__init__          l1.__rmul__          l1.pop
l1.__doc__           l1.__iter__          l1.__setattr__       l1.remove
l1.__eq__            l1.__le__            l1.__setitem__       l1.reverse
l1.__format__        l1.__len__           l1.__setslice__      l1.sort
l1.__ge__            l1.__lt__            l1.__sizeof__        
l1.__getattribute__  l1.__mul__           l1.__str__           
l1.__getitem__       l1.__ne__            l1.__subclasshook__  

In [2]: l1.

On the last line, you type the object name, a period, and then press TAB. IPython then lists all the attributes of the object.

I find IPython an invaluable tool for exploring object attributes. It is far more convenient to use than the standard Python interactive prompt. Among other nifty things, putting a question mark after an object gives you its doc string:

In [6]: d.update?
Type:   	builtin_function_or_method
Base Class: <type 'builtin_function_or_method'>
String Form:    <built-in method update of dict object at 0xa3c024c>
Namespace:  Interactive
Docstring:
    D.update(E, **F) -> None.  Update D from dict/iterable E and F.
    If E has a .keys() method, does:     for k in E: D[k] = E[k]
    If E lacks .keys() method, does:     for (k, v) in E: D[k] = v
    In either case, this is followed by: for k in F: D[k] = F[k]

And, when available, two question marks gives you its source code:

In [18]: np.sum??
Type:   	function
Base Class: <type 'function'>
String Form:    <function sum at 0x9c501ec>
Namespace:  Interactive
File:   	/usr/lib/python2.6/dist-packages/numpy/core/fromnumeric.py
Definition: np.sum(a, axis=None, dtype=None, out=None)
Source:
def sum(a, axis=None, dtype=None, out=None):
...
    if isinstance(a, _gentype):
        res = _sum_(a)
        if out is not None:
            out[...] = res
            return out
        return res
    try:
        sum = a.sum
    except AttributeError:
        return _wrapit(a, 'sum', axis, dtype, out)
    return sum(axis, dtype, out)
share|improve this answer

If the object (which often might be a module) has many methods or attributes using dir or the TAB completion of ipython can get to complex to keep track.

In such cases I use filter like in the following example:

filter(lambda s: 'sin' in s.lower(), dir(numpy))

which results in

['arcsin',
 'arcsinh',
 'csingle',
 'isinf',
 'isposinf',
 'sin',
 'sinc',
 'single',
 'singlecomplex',
 'sinh']

I find that very handy to explore unknown objects from which I expect that they must have a method (or attribute) which should have as part of its name.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.