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Below are my .cpp file and .h file. After getting a lot of help from Mike, I finally get it working; however, when I compile it on Visual Studio 2012, it gives me 2 warnings about '<' signed/unsigned mismatch right on the line "for (int i = 0; i < s.length(); i++)". Can anyone tell me what I did wrong in there ?

[code]
#include"DownwardStack.h"
#include<iostream>
#include<string>
#include<memory>
#include<cassert>

using namespace std;

unique_ptr<string> reverse_string(string const &s);

int main()
{
    int count = 0;
    string s;

    unique_ptr<string> reverse(new string());

    unique_ptr<DownwardStack<int>> ptr(new DownwardStack<int>());

    cout << "Your string: ";
    cin >> s;

    reverse = reverse_string(s);

    cout << "Your reverse string is: " << *reverse << endl;

    if(ptr->IsEmpty())
        cout << "ptr is empty" << endl;
    else
        cout << "ptr is not empty" << endl;

    assert(ptr->IsEmpty());
    assert(!ptr->IsFull());
    ptr->Push(5);
    ptr->Push(7);
    ptr->Push(10);
    ptr->Push(15);
    ptr->Push(4);

    cout << "Stack size: " << ptr->GetSize() << endl;
    cout << "Top element: " << ptr->Peek() << endl;
    cout << "Pop one element out." << endl;
    ptr->Pop();
    cout << "Top element: " << ptr->Peek() << endl;

    return 0;
}

unique_ptr<string> reverse_string(string const &s)
{
    DownwardStack<char> stack;

    cout << s.length() << endl;
    // Here it gives me a warning on the for loop
    for (int i = 0; i < s.length(); i++)
    {
        stack.Push(s[i]);
    }


    unique_ptr<string> result(new string);


    // Again it gives me a warning on the for loop
    for(int i = 0; i < s.length(); i++)
    {
        *result += stack.Peek();
        stack.Pop();
    }

    return result;
}

[/code]

This is my header file .h

[code]
#pragma once
#include<cassert>
#include<stack>
#include<string>

// size: number of elements inside the array
const int FIXED_ARRAYED_STACK_CAPACITY = 100;

template<class T>
class DownwardStack
{
public:
    DownwardStack();
    ~DownwardStack();
    // 1 step
    // O(0)
    int GetSize() const {return size;}
    bool IsEmpty() const {return (size==0);}
    bool IsFull() const {return (size==FIXED_ARRAYED_STACK_CAPACITY);}
    T Peek();
    void Pop();
    void Push(T val);
    void Clear();
    void DisplayStack();
private:
    int size;
    T elements[FIXED_ARRAYED_STACK_CAPACITY];
};

// O(1)
template<class T>
DownwardStack<T>::DownwardStack()
{
    size = 0;
}

template<class T>
DownwardStack<T>::~DownwardStack()
{
}

// assert = 1 step
// IsEmpty() = 1 step
// total = 2 steps
// f(n) = 2
// O(1)
template<class T>
T DownwardStack<T>::Peek()
{
    assert(!IsEmpty());
    return elements[FIXED_ARRAYED_STACK_CAPACITY - size];
}

// In order to take something out, it must not be empty
// assert = 1 step
// IsEmpty() = 1 step
// size-- = 1 step
// total = 3 steps
// O(1)
template<class T>
void DownwardStack<T>::Pop()
{
    assert(!IsEmpty());
    size--;
}

// In order to put in something, the stack must not be full
// assert = 1 step
// IsFull = 1 step
// assignment = 1 step
// size++ = 1 step
// total = 4 steps
// O(1)
template<class T>
void DownwardStack<T>::Push(T val)
{
    assert(!IsFull());
    elements[FIXED_ARRAYED_STACK_CAPACITY - size - 1] = val;
    size++;
}

template<class T>
void DownwardStack<T>::Clear()
{
    size = FIXED_ARRAYED_STACK_CAPACITY;
    assert(IsEmpty());
}



[/code]
share|improve this question
4  
Why on earth would you return a pointer to a dynamically allocated string? Just return a string by value and reduce the amount of gratuitous indirection in the world. Likewise, the stack should be a local automatic variable. –  Mike Seymour Sep 24 '13 at 11:00
    
It's the homework and it's driving me crazy Mike !!!! –  Hoang Minh Sep 24 '13 at 11:09
    
I'd suggest rethinking const correctness for your stack class. Also, why use a constant somewhere, when you could easily template <typename T, std::size_t FIXED_ARRAY_CAPACITY = 100>? –  nijansen Sep 24 '13 at 11:14
1  
@Jarod42 Homework's okay. It's the question that isn't specific enough. They need to break it down to the smallest example of the problem they're having... do the analysis themselves. –  Peter Wood Sep 24 '13 at 11:45
3  
@Jarod42 That is a terrible downvote reason. You could argue that this question is not focused enough, that it does not show enough engagement to solve the problem by oneself, or a million other reasons; but downvoting simply because it is a homework question does not make sense. This may be a valuable read. –  nijansen Sep 24 '13 at 11:52

1 Answer 1

I would implement this as

std::string reverse_string(std::string const & s) {
    return {s.rbegin(), s.rend()};            // C++11 or later
    return std::string(s.rbegin(), s.rend()); // historical dialects of C++
}

If you really must make life difficult for yourself by using a stack: push each character into it, then pop each out into the new string. By the nature of stacks, you'll pop the characters in the reverse order.

std::string reverse_string(std::string const & s) {
    DownwardStack<char> stack;

    // write a loop to push each character of "s" onto "stack"

    std::string result;

    // write a loop to pop each character from "stack" into "result"

    return result;
}

If you absolutely have to return a unique pointer, (which you really, really shouldn't), then that becomes

std::unique_ptr<std::string> reverse_string(std::string const & s) {
    DownwardStack<char> stack;

    // write a loop to push each character of "s" onto "stack"

    std::unique_ptr<std::string> result(new std::string);

    // write a loop to pop each character from "stack" into "*result"

    return result;
}

And do the world a favour: only use new when you actually need it. There's no reason to use unique_ptr either for the stack (make that automatic), or the return value (since std::string is movable).

share|improve this answer
1  
It's not that I want to do it the difficult way. It's what the professor asks me to :( But Thanks Mike –  Hoang Minh Sep 24 '13 at 11:12
    
How would I solve the problem by using unique pointer Mike ? I have no clue how to do it.... –  Hoang Minh Sep 24 '13 at 11:14
    
@user2383193: OK, the second paragraph should give you a pointer. –  Mike Seymour Sep 24 '13 at 11:14
    
Can you explain a little bit more Mike ? I really don't know how to build a unique pointer function –  Hoang Minh Sep 24 '13 at 11:20
    
@user2383193: OK, I've added a bit more detail. A function returning a unique_ptr is just like a function returning any other object type. –  Mike Seymour Sep 24 '13 at 11:25

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