Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a double value on my ViewModel and want to bind a TextBlock's Text, such that:

128228.094545 gets formatted to 128228[x]09, where [x] is the decimal separator according to the computer's culture settings.

I've tried:

Text="{Binding Value, StringFormat='{}{0:F2}'}"

Doesn't work: The value gets displayed 128228.09 regardless of the correct decimal separator symbol.

Text="{Binding Value, StringFormat='{}{0:N2}'}"

Renders digit grouping symbol ([d], y in en-US), which I don't want: 128[d]228[x]09

Text="{Binding Value, StringFormat='{}{0:0.00}'}"

Obviously doesn't work.

What's the right formatting string?

share|improve this question
    
Haven't worked with WPF yet, but wouldn't StringFormat='{}{0:######.##}' (or simply StringFormat='{}{0:#.##}') work? –  Corak Sep 24 '13 at 12:47
    
Nope, because that renders a '.' always,, although the culture might have a comma. –  Marc Sep 24 '13 at 13:05

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think the issue is that when StringFormat is used in a data binding it does not honor the current culture.

In the past I've used a simple IValueConverter to format the value. This can be useful if your application allows a user to specify the format options for all numbers e.g. number of decimal places. Alternatively you can use the ConverterParameter to specify the format string and simply return:

String.Format(CultureInfo.CurrentCulture, converterParameter, value)

If you don't need to surround the value with a prefix or suffix the following converter should allow you to convert to and from formatted values:

public class StringFormatConverter : IValueConverter
{
    public object Convert(object value, Type targetType,
                          object parameter, CultureInfo culture)
    {
        var parameterString = parameter as string;
        if (value != null && parameterString != null)
        {
            return String.Format(CultureInfo.CurrentCulture, "{0:"+ parameterString + "}", value);
        }
        else
        {           
            return string.Empty;
        }
    }


    public object ConvertBack(object value, Type targetType,
                              object parameter, CultureInfo culture)
    {
        if (targetType == typeof (double))
        {
            return System.Convert.ToDouble(value, CultureInfo.CurrentCulture);
        }
        else if (targetType == typeof(int))
        {
            return System.Convert.ToInt32(value, CultureInfo.CurrentCulture);
        }
        // Any other supported types
        else
        {
            throw new NotImplementedException();
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
That worked for me thanks, do you mind posting the ConvertBack? To you handle every possible number TargetType seperately? –  Marc Sep 24 '13 at 13:36
    
Based on the TargetType you should be able to use System.Convert i.e. System.Convert.ToDouble(value, CultureInfo.CurrentCulture). I'll try and update the answer later. –  peterot Sep 24 '13 at 14:49

I think your first definition is correct. Thing is that the formatting is always done based on the culture which is set. Don't know what exactly you are using but it depends how to set the culture for your app.

Here is a great blog post describing it for WPF because there are some issues defining the culture manually...

http://www.west-wind.com/weblog/posts/2009/Jun/14/WPF-Bindings-and-CurrentCulture-Formatting

share|improve this answer
    
I want the current culture to be applied, not a custom culture, but WPF obviously ignores it.. –  Marc Sep 24 '13 at 13:36

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.