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I have the following test method, which takes an array of strings, copies it, sorts it and then asserts that the sorted copy elements should be different from the original.

This test should pass in most cases, but I think it should fail if the input array happens to already be sorted.

I am unable to get PEX to discover this case (other than providing it as a seed input). Is there anything I can configure in PEX, or change about the way the test is written, to make it more likely that PEX will discover this problem? Is it beyond the capabilities of PEX/Z3 to discover such an input?

[TestClass]
public class SortingPexTest
{
    [PexMethod(TestEmissionFilter = PexTestEmissionFilter.All, MaxConstraintSolverTime = 4)]
    [PexAllowedContractRequiresFailure]
    public void TM([PexAssumeNotNull] String[] L0)
    {
        PexAssume.AreElementsNotNull(L0);
        PexAssume.AreDistinctValues(L0);

        String[] L1 = new String[L0.Length];
        L0.CopyTo(L1, 0);
        Array.Sort(L1);

        PexAssert.IsTrue(!L0.SequenceEqual(L1));
    }
}

Microsoft Pex 0.94.51023.0 Microsoft Pex Visual Studio Extensions

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1 Answer 1

Some versions of Array.Copy are optimized in the current CLR implementation by calling out to native code. It appears that Pex is hit by this fact because it cannot trace the data-flow through the Array.Copy routine.

With this modification, the test fails multiple times:

String[] L1 = L0.OrderBy(x => x).ToArray();

This is probably a flaw in Pex because it does not substitute Array.Copy with an analyzable version like it does with many other things.

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