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We have an event table with users registering and playing our games.

So assume we have three fields

timestamp ts
int  userId
int  eventId               (I.e. 1 = Register, 2 = Login)

What we want to calculate is the retention ratio from a given day and onward. A user should be considered active if he have played the last week (i.e. 7 days)

E.g. lets say I want to se the retention curve for users registered 2013-08-01

The output table could be something like

Date         Day     Reg 2013-08-01,  Active,    Retention
2013-08-01   1       24 567           24 567     100%
2013-08-02   2       24 567           24 567     100%
2013-08-03   3       24 567           24 567     100%
2013-08-04   4       24 567           24 567     100%
2013-08-05   5       24 567           24 567     100%
2013-08-05   6       24 567           24 567     100%
2013-08-05   7       24 567           24 567     100%
2013-08-05   8       24 567           24 125     98.2%
2013-08-05   9       24 567           24 027     97.8%
2013-08-05  10       24 567           23 997     97.5%
2013-08-05  11       24 567           23 200     96.3%
2013-08-05  12       24 567           22 890     95.3%
....

My SQL skills are simply to bad! Free beers (Or GT's In Stockholm ...) for anyone who comes up with this SQL!

share|improve this question
    
it's possible, but looks like a big query to write.. could you do something similar, looking at how long users stay? look when they logged in: min, max, max-min tells you how long they stay, count(*)/(max-min) the frequency, now-max how long ago they abandoned ship... –  Felipe Hoffa Sep 25 '13 at 0:12
    
Yeas we will have to think about how to this the best way. One problem with these kind of calculations are that they have be calculate each day for all dates. –  Gunnar Eketrapp Sep 25 '13 at 7:00
    
Was yaba.*dou answer useful? I upvoted it at least :). To make answering easier, could you include access to a sample dataset next time? It saves the time to find or create a similar one, and then the answers answer the actual problem! –  Felipe Hoffa Oct 1 '13 at 0:28

1 Answer 1

To get the number of active users I would probably try to do something similar to this in Google BigQuery:

SELECT count(distinct U1.userId, 1000000) as activeUser, 
       left(U1.startTime, 10) AS day 
FROM [YourDataSet.YourTable] as U1 
JOIN EACH [YourDataSet.YourTable] as U2 on U1.userId = U2.userId 
WHERE U2.startTime = U1.startTime -- if the user came today OR
OR (U2.startTime < U1.startTime AND 
    TIMESTAMP(U2.startTime) >= DATE_ADD(TIMESTAMP(U1.startTime), -7, "DAY")) -- if the user came sometime in the past and not more than 7 days
GROUP BY day
ORDER BY day

*Note, in my case the date is a string. For your specific problem you will probably need to add custom conditions to handle your event type. Please also verify the condition to check if it is earlier than 7 days as I have no tested this part.

This query only allow to get the number of active users. For the rest you may need to do it in another query. Maybe there is a way to it all at once with unions or something similar but that would be a really long query. Hope this helps!

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