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My aim is to monitor child process without creating any pipe while still being able to discriminate stderr from stdout, and being able to retrieve exit code. I would like to avoid using named pipes or /dev/shm since they wouldn't be cleaned up in case of SIGKILL (yes, I have nice and tactful users)

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1 Answer 1

After picking ideas on stackoverflow, I came to this. Not sure it is the smartest way, feel free to correct/enhance !

% monitor "echo stdout:" "echo stderr:" /bin/bash -c "echo FOO;BAR"
stdout: FOO
stderr: /bin/bash: BAR: command not found
% echo Exit-code: $?
Exit-code: 127

There's room for improvement as it keeps spawning 2 child processes, 1 per redirection I suspect.

#
# PURPOSE 
#   redirect stdout and stderr to 2 distinct functions and retrieve exit code
#
# USAGE 
#   monitor HANDLER_OUT HANDLER_ERR COMMAND ...
#   HANDLER_OUT and HANDLER_ERR can be commands or functions
#   COMMAND is the full command which outputs are being monitors
#
# RESULT
#   returns COMMAND exit-code
#
# EXAMPLES
#   monitor "echo OUT=" "echo ERR=" /bin/bash -c "FOOBAR; echo Done."
#   monitor myfunction1 myfunction2 /bin/bash -c "FOOBAR; echo Done.;/bin/false"
#
monitor () {
    monitor_exit_code "$@" 1001>&1 1002>&2
}

monitor_exit_code () {
    local code=0
    while read data
    do
        code=$data
    done < <( monitor_stdout "$@" 1000>&1 )
    return $code
}


monitor_stdout () {
    local parser_out=$1;shift
    while read data
    do
        ($parser_out "$data") >&1001 
    done < <( monitor_stderr "$@" 1001>&1 )
}

monitor_stderr () {
    local parser_err=$1;shift
    while read data
    do
        ($parser_err "$data") >&1002 
    done < <( "$@" 2>&1 1>&1001 ; echo >&1000 $?  ) 
}
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