Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Given this code:

public class TwoThreads {
    static Thread laurel, hardy;

    public static void main(String[] args) {
         laurel = new Thread() {
             public void run() {
                 System.out.println("A");
                 try {
                     hardy.sleep(1000);
                 } catch (Exception e) {
                     System.out.println("B");
                 }
                 System.out.println("C");
             }
         };

         hardy = new Thread() {
             public void run() {
                 System.out.println("D");
                 try {
                     laurel.wait();
                 } catch (Exception e) {
                     System.out.println("E");
                 } 
                 System.out.println("F");
             }
         };
         laurel.start();
         hardy.start();
     }
}

The output includes:

A C D E and F

I'm puzzled about why F is included, given that an IllegalMonitorStateException is thrown when wait() is called outside of synchronized code. Why is the print statement of F reached? I believe that the thread stack blows then, but then the program passes to its main stack, is this correct?

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

You are catching the exception in the block that prints "E" effectively swallowing it. The code will then continue on to print "F". Blocks that simply catch exceptions and do nothing else are dangerous for this reason.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 absolutely right, if you want to print to a log while catching exceptions, make sure you re-throw them afterwards with throw; and not throw e; which would throw a new exception. –  ajs410 Apr 16 '10 at 15:04

you catch the exception so control goes to the catch block then continues executing the code after the try/catch.

share|improve this answer

In the code above as long as their are non application fatal errors after "D" is printed, "F" will always be printed as all catchable errors are handled.

If there are no thread hangs, this behaviour will be consistent.

Add a boolean check to "F" which is suppressed if there is an error thrown and that will give you the desired behaviour.

share|improve this answer

As a side note, you're calling Thread's static sleep method on objects, which does something other than you might expect. You shouldn't call static class methods on instances for this reason.

(As for why F is printed, the other guys are correct)

share|improve this answer

I wonder how you know IllegalMonitorStateException is being thrown. You are consuming any Exception and not doing something like e.printStackTrace();.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.