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I am java programmer, I am new at C# and I realy do not understand why Nullable type is needed. Can any one explain me? For example I have code:

 XmlReader xr=...
 string propertyValue=xr.GetAttribute("SomeProperty");
 if(propertyValue!=null) {
 //some code here
}

The propertyValue type is 'string' not 'string?' but 'GetAttribute' can return null. So, in fact, I should for each variable check if its value is null or not, so why nullable type '*?' is needed in general. How its can be useful?

And the second question: How write my own method with return type 'string' and return null value from it?

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The key conceptual problem in this question is simply: picking string as the example... since string is not a struct, it doesn't fit. If you make the example int, it may become more self-explanatory –  Marc Gravell Sep 24 '13 at 14:37

3 Answers 3

The Nullable<T> type is used for structs. These are somewhat similar to Java's primitives (e.g. they can't be null), but are much more powerful and flexible (e.g. users can create their own struct types and you can call methods like ToString() on them).

When you want a nullable struct ("value type"), use Nullable<T> (or the identical T?). classes ("reference type") are always nullable, just like in Java.

E.g.

//non-nullable int
int MyMethod1()
{
    return 0;
}

//nullable int
int? MyMethod2()
{
    return null;
}

//nullable string (there's no such thing as a non-nullable string)
string MyMethod3()
{
    return null;
}
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You can have return type as string and return null, since string is a reference type, it can hold null as well.

public string SomeMethod()
{
    return null;
}

The propertyValue type is 'string' not 'string?'

Data type with ? are Nullable<T> data types which only works with value types, since string is a reference type you can't have string?. ? is only syntactic sugar.

In C# and Visual Basic, you mark a value type as nullable by using the ? notation after the value type.

You may also see: Value Types and Reference Types

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Answer to last question:

Long way:

private string MethodReturnsString()
{
   string str1 = "this is a string";
   return str1;
}

Short way:

private string MethodReturnsString()
{
   return "this is a string";
}

str1 filled with: "this is a string", will be returned to the method which calls it.

Call this method as follow:

string returnedString;
returnedString = MethodReturnsString();

returnedString will be filled with "this is a string" from MethodReturnsString();

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