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After scanning my web application with Acunetix, the results showed 9 instances of "HTML Form found in redirect page". The HTTP headers to reproduce the test attack are as follows:

Request
GET /entities/add HTTP/1.1
Pragma: no-cache
Referer: https://test.mysite.com/entities/view
Acunetix-Aspect: enabled
Acunetix-Aspect-Password: 082119f75623eb7abd7bf357698ff66c
Acunetix-Aspect-Queries: filelist;aspectalerts
Cookie: __AntiXsrfToken=97c0a6bb164d4121b07327df405f9db4; mysitecookie=
Host: test.mysite.com
Connection: Keep-alive
Accept-Encoding: gzip,deflate
User-Agent: Mozilla/5.0 (compatible; MSIE 9.0; Windows NT 6.1; WOW64; Trident/5.0)
Acunetix-Product: WVS/8.0 (Acunetix Web Vulnerability Scanner - NORMAL)
Acunetix-Scanning-agreement: Third Party Scanning PROHIBITED
Acunetix-User-agreement: http://www.acunetix.com/wvs/disc.htm
Accept: */*

Response
HTTP/1.1 302 Found
Cache-Control: private
Content-Type: text/html; charset=utf-8
Location: /login
Server: Microsoft-IIS/7.5
X-AspNet-Version: 4.0.30319
Set-Cookie: mysitecookie=; expires=Mon, 11-Oct-1999 22:00:00 GMT; path=/; HttpOnly
X-Powered-By: ASP.NET
Date: Tue, 24 Sep 2013 10:38:12 GMT
Content-Length: 9447

The Location: /login part of the Response led me to believe that if I ended the response after redirecting the user to the login page, the vulnerability would be plugged. So I changed all instances of this code:

protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    if (!HttpContext.Current.User.Identity.IsAuthenticated)
    {
        Response.Redirect("/login");
    }
    else
    {
        // etc
    }
}

to:

protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    if (!HttpContext.Current.User.Identity.IsAuthenticated)
    {
        Response.Redirect("/login", true);
    }
    else
    {
        // etc
    }
}

What could be the reason that it's still showing as vulnerable?

share|improve this question
    
Acunetix has lots of documentation. Instead of asking people here, why don't you read the Acunetix documentation? acunetix.com/blog/web-security-zone/… describes your particular scenario. The theoretical problem here is that you could have rendered the actual page along with a redirect to the login page. –  bzlm Sep 24 '13 at 15:40

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The flag is being raised because there is an HTML form in the page, along with a redirect in the response header. I assume this is a vulnerability because it can give an unauthenticated user some insight into how your application works. What you can do to prevent this flag from being raised is to CLEAR your response before redirecting.

Try the following:

protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    if (!HttpContext.Current.User.Identity.IsAuthenticated)
    {
        Response.Clear();
        Response.Redirect("/login", true); // btw true is the default...
    }
    else
    {
        // etc
    }
}

If you're setting Session variables, cookies, etc. then you'll need to tweak that a bit so that you're sure everything makes it into the response e.g. use the endResponse=false, Response.End(); return; etc.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.web.httpresponse.clear.aspx

share|improve this answer
    
The Clear method does not clear header information. This is something i found in link you suggested, can you explain it as i am also new in web technology and these two statements seems conflicting . –  Suraj Singh Sep 24 '13 at 16:11
2  
HTTP Requests and Responses are made up of a header and a body (and method, see link below). In your case, your header is saying "No" (Redirect) but your body is saying "Yes" (hah sorry I couldn't resist) by sending (at least some of) the HTML form. You can clear headers if you want with a different method, but in your case you don't want to clear the headers (you want it to redirect) you only want to clear the body. geekexplains.blogspot.com/2008/06/… –  mikey Sep 24 '13 at 16:26
    
Thanks +1 for helping out. –  Suraj Singh Sep 24 '13 at 16:29
1  
@Ela - I know what you're saying, but in this case (sending to a login page) -- I think a redirect is actually more appropriate than a transfer. In another case, such as proceeding to step 2 of a shopping-cart checkout, then yes a transfer would be ideal. Even more ideal (for the login page scenario) would be to simply use Forms authentication, which I believe would also implement a redirect. –  mikey Sep 24 '13 at 17:58
2  
@user982119 - You should seriously consider using forms authentication, instead of hand-crafting "logged-in checks" on all of your pages - you can place all the pages that should be restricted in a folder and restrict access to that folder automatically by role using forms auth. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/7t6b43z4.aspx –  mikey Sep 24 '13 at 18:05

Response.Redirect sends an additional round trip to the client (Response Code 302). Meaning the client will have to call the "new" URL. This is usually something you don't want to do.

In .Net you also have the possibility to do the redirect on the server directly, meaning without an additional roundtrip.

Instead of Response.Redirect you want to call Server.Transfer or Server.TransferRequest (which is the new method which needs integrated application pool).

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.web.httpserverutility.transferrequest.aspx

if Server is not available in your context, you'll also find an instance of HttpServerUtility in HttpContext.Current.

share|improve this answer
    
This answer has nothing to do with the reported vulnerability or its resolution. See this answer for more information. –  bzlm Sep 24 '13 at 17:15
1  
Of cause it does. Doing Response.Redirect is not a good thing because it causes extra traffic and usually is treated as potential security vulnerability. That's why you want to do redirects to your own site on the server and not sending a 302 to the client... That's exactly how the routing works. And as /Login seems to be on the same server/site, this is a valid option to not cause any issues... –  MichaC Sep 24 '13 at 17:21
    
Sorry, you're comparing apples and oranges. Check the linked-to answer and the link to the description for this particular reported vulnerability at Acunetix. Also, remark about "Response.Redirect" being not a "good thing" is just nonsense. :) –  bzlm Sep 24 '13 at 17:23
    
I think you still don't get it... Instead of fixing the vulnerability reported, you can simply prevent this from happening at all... He has actually control over the code so he could use Server.Transfer instead of Response.Redirect. This would not even be noticed by Acunetix that the redirect occurred because the response would be a normal Code 200... That's why I posted that as a possible solution. If the solution does not work, let me know, then I can delete the answer –  MichaC Sep 24 '13 at 17:28
    
If the goal is to just hide the reported vulnerability from Acunetix, then sure. But I have a feeling the goal is to actually understand and then either remove or disregard the reported vulnerability. Also, disguising the login page as the "add entity" page creates a bad web experience because it can confuse the browser, mess with cachability, etc. The purpose of Server.Transfer is to maintain state across a transition from one web form to another, not to perform hidden redirection. –  bzlm Sep 24 '13 at 17:34

Well i can't say on what criterias Acunetix calculates vulnerability but i can suggest you to use response.redirect("url",false) overload -check here

If you specify true for the endResponse parameter, this method calls the End method for the original request, which throws a ThreadAbortException exception when it completes. This exception has a detrimental effect on Web application performance, which is why passing false for the endResponse parameter is recommended.

protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    if (!HttpContext.Current.User.Identity.IsAuthenticated)
    {
        Response.Clear();
        Response.Redirect("/login", false);
        Context.ApplicationInstance.CompleteRequest();
    }
    else
    {
        // etc
    }
}

Context.ApplicationInstance.CompleteRequest(); Causes ASP.NET to bypass all events and filtering in the HTTP pipeline chain of execution and directly execute the EndRequest event. It bypasses events which causes ThreadAbortException.

share|improve this answer
    
    
@bzlm Thanks for the link. Many web browsers implemented this code in a manner that violated this standard, changing the request type of the new request to GET, regardless of the type employed in the original request (e.g. POST)-en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HTTP_302 –  Suraj Singh Sep 24 '13 at 15:58
    
@bzlm As per the screenshot it shows method type GET,So is there any way to avoid this or users have to cope with that. acunetix.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/… –  Suraj Singh Sep 24 '13 at 15:59
    
Sorry, but I'm not sure what you mean. Either way, this answer has nothing to do with the reported vulnerability or its resolution. See this answer for more information. –  bzlm Sep 24 '13 at 17:15

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