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I have an API that provides an Account resource based on the authentication (login) that is supplied. As a user can only have one account, and can only see it's own account and not those of others, this API will basically be a single resource API in all cases.

So to keep things simple, I have this resource under the url accounts/ and when you access accounts/?username=dude&password=veryhard you'll get your account data (if you dohn't supply authentication you'll get a 403).

Now I wonder if this is RESTful. Also, you should be able to update your account info, and I wonder if PUT would be appropriate. In my knowledge, PUT should be done on a unique URI for the resource. Well, is this a unique URI for the resource? Generally a URI for an account would look like accounts/3515/ where 3515 is the account id. However, users don't know their account id. Also, there should be more ways to log in, instead of a username + password you should also be able to use a token (like accounts/?token=d3r90jfhda139hg). So then we got 2 URL's that point to the same resource, which also isn't really beautiful for a RESTful URI, is it?

So, what would be the most RESTful solution? Or should I not do this RESTful?

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You are asking 4 questions into one, I suggest you post a single question so that I can reply in a concise helpful way. – dendini Sep 24 '13 at 14:46
@dendini The 4 questions all have the same context and I don't like to create multiple questions and having to explain the same story for each question. Also one answer might make the other questions obsolete. If you like you can only answer one question. If that would help me I would be thankful for that. – rednaw Sep 24 '13 at 14:52

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

REST purists will consider that use of /accounts/ to obtain a single account is bad practice as it should specify a collection. Instead consider a key which cannot be mistaken for an ID, for example if your IDs are UUIDs then use a token such as 'me' so your URL is /accounts/me. This has the advantage that if later on you wish to obtain different account information, say for example you need to list users or you have an administration system using the same API, then you can expand it easily.

Putting username and password in the URL is also not pure REST. The query parameters should be directly related to the resource you are obtaining; commonly filtering and limiting the resources returned. Instead you should seriously consider using something like HTTP Basic authentication over an encrypted (HTTPS) connection so that you separate out your authentication/authorisation and resource systems. If you prefer to use a token system then take a look at oauth or hawk.

Finally, yes if you use PUT you should supply a full resource identifier. Given that it is very common for systems to read data before updating it the lack of ID won't be a problem as that will come back as part of the prior GET.

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  1. Yes accounts/?username=dude&password=veryhard is a correct REST URL.
  2. PUT is used with an id if it used to update a resource, if you use it to create you must supply an ID. otherwise you use post to create a resource without id
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