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I have to write an assembly program that calculates (a * (bc) * d) where a, b, c, d are variables stored into the data segment in signed 8-bit format. (I have to assume that the result is represented as a signed 32-bit number)

I have written the following code

data segment

    a db 1
    b db 9
    c db 3
    d db 4 

    x dw ?


ends

stack segment
    dw   128  dup(0)
ends

code segment
start:

    mov ax, data
    mov ds, ax
    mov es, ax


    ; what would the difference be in the following three lines if the variables where signed?
    mov al, b
    sub al,c
    mul a
    mul d


    ;treating result as a 16bit - how about signed?
    mov x,ax 





    mov ax, 4c00h ; exit to operating system.
    int 21h    
ends

end start

My questions are as follows: What are the differences in I need to know when treating numbers as signed and ansigned, apart from registry sizes (al,ah,bh,bl, ecc... 8bit), (ax,bx,cd,dx, 16bit)?

How do I treat a 32 bit variable differently than a 16 variable, apart from storing it ito a DW variable?

For your convenience I have written a short version of the questions above in the relavant parts of code.

Can somebody please help me, please? Thanks in advance for your time.

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1 Answer

In general, the contents of registers/memory are just sequences (with specific lengths) of bits, and the concept of signed/unsigned is irrelevant.

There are a few instructions where it matters whether the operators should be viewed as signed or unsigned. Some examples are:

  • Multiplication: Use MUL for unsigned operands, and IMUL for signed operands.
  • Division: Use DIV for unsigned operands, and IDIV for signed operands.
  • Conditional jumps: JA means jump if (unsigned) above, JG means jump if (signed) greater. JB means jump if (unsigned) below, JL means jump if (signed) less, and so on.

;treating result as a 16bit - how about signed?
mov x,ax 

MOV has no notion of sign, it just copies the bits from the source to the destination. All it needs to know is how many bits to copy (i.e. the size of the operands).

One exception is if you're using a widening MOV:

movzx ax,byte ptr [foo]  ; zero-extend the byte foo into ax (for unsigned numbers)
movsx ax,byte ptr [foo]  ; sign-extend the byte foo into ax (for signed numbers)

How do I treat a 32 bit variable differently than a 16 variable, apart from storing it ito a DW variable?

DW would be for the 16-bit variable. For a 32-bit variable you'd use DD.

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