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I'm debugging a program I wrote and noticed something strange. I set up an HTTP server on port 12345 that servers a simple OGG video file, and attempted to access it from Firefox.

Upon sniffing the network requests, I found these two requests were made:

GET /video.ogv HTTP/1.1
Host: 127.0.0.1:12345
User-Agent: Mozilla/5.0 (Macintosh; U; Intel Mac OS X 10.5; en-US; rv:1.9.1.5) Gecko/20091102 Firefox/3.5.5
Accept: text/html,application/xhtml+xml,application/xml;q=0.9,*/*;q=0.8
Accept-Language: en-us,en;q=0.5
Accept-Encoding: gzip,deflate
Accept-Charset: ISO-8859-1,utf-8;q=0.7,*;q=0.7
Keep-Alive: 300
Connection: keep-alive


GET /video.ogv HTTP/1.1
Host: 127.0.0.1:12345
User-Agent: Mozilla/5.0 (Macintosh; U; Intel Mac OS X 10.5; en-US; rv:1.9.1.5) Gecko/20091102 Firefox/3.5.5
Accept: text/html,application/xhtml+xml,application/xml;q=0.9,*/*;q=0.8
Accept-Language: en-us,en;q=0.5
Accept-Encoding: gzip,deflate
Accept-Charset: ISO-8859-1,utf-8;q=0.7,*;q=0.7
Keep-Alive: 300
Connection: keep-alive
Range: bytes=8122368-

The video is almost 8 MB in size, so the fact that the second request specifics 8122368 bytes, which is 7932 KB, suggests it is requesting the very end of the file for some reason. Anyone have ideas?

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1  
I love the link to your localhost address. Amusing, but not that useful. Let's see how many people report it as a broken link :-) – paxdiablo Dec 14 '09 at 1:46
    
Sorry, I'm aware that it isn't useful, I just wrote it without thinking. It's been removed. – user123003 Dec 14 '09 at 1:53
up vote 8 down vote accepted

In order to support seeking and playing back regions of the media that aren't yet downloaded, Gecko uses HTTP 1.1 byte-range requests to retrieve the media from the seek target position. So because Ogg files don't contain their duration, the initial download connection is terminated. Then there is a seek to the end of the Ogg file and read a bit of data to extract the time duration of the media. Info from here and here.

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Some media format have meta data at the end of the file, and this data is usually required to allow proper seeking of the video.

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Ogg files don't have their duration so this technique is used by the browser to find that out. – Ambrosia Dec 14 '09 at 1:47

Its actually requesting 8122368 bytes starting backwards from the end. Which is 7.74MB if I did my calcs correctly.

it might be something in how the buffering for that file type is done.

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No, it is requesting the bytes from 8122368 to the end, which would be fileSize - 8122368 bytes. See: w3.org/Protocols/rfc2616/rfc2616-sec14.html#sec14.35 – Nicolas Goy Dec 14 '09 at 1:46

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