Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I wanted to find an integral ((sin x)^8, {x,0,2*Pi}) and tried to write a simple program, without any external modules as "math", which calculate Taylor series and summarize it for interval (0,2*Pi) but an errors

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "E:\python\ShAD\sin.py", line 27, in <module>
    sum+=(ser(i*2*3.1415926/k))**8
  File "E:\python\ShAD\sin.py", line 21, in ser
    sin_part+=((-1)**(j-1))*(a**(2j-1))/(fact(2*j-1))
ZeroDivisionError: 0.0 to a negative or complex power

suddenly occurs. And I just don't see where something is divided by zero or have power of complex number, all variables have only real positive value. "k" is a value both for terms of series quantity and interval (0,2*Pi) division.

sum=0
k=20
res=0

def fact(t):
    if t==0 or t==1:
        res=1

    else:
        res=1
        for l in range(2,t+1):
            res=res*l           
    return res

def ser(a):
    sin_part=a
    for j in range(2,k):
        print fact(2*j-1)
        sin_part+=((-1)**(j-1))*(a**(2j-1))/(fact(2*j-1))
        print 'yay'
    return sin_part


for i in range(0,k-1):
    sum+=(ser(i*2*3.1415926/k))**8
print sum
share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

And I just don't see where something is divided by zero or have power of complex number, all variables have only real positive value.

Not true. On the first iteration of

for i in range(0,k-1):
    sum+=(ser(i*2*3.1415926/k))**8

you have i=0, so the argument to ser is 0, so a == 0, and you have (a**(2j-1)), which takes 0 to a complex power.

Maybe you meant a**(2*j-1)? Python uses j for the unit imaginary, and so 2j-1 is a complex number.

share|improve this answer
    
Maybe you meant a**(2*j-1)? So, it is! Thank you very much, I just misspeled one expression. Fixed it and all goes fine. –  Mikic Sep 24 '13 at 16:02
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.