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I have a non-database-backed class in Ruby:

class User
  attr_accessor :countries
end

I want countries to simply be an array of ISO country codes (US, GB, CA, AU, etc) and I don't want to build a separate model to hold each. Is there a magic way to make Ruby understand that :countries is an array and treat it accordingly, or do I need to write the countries and countries= methods?

I tried just setting the countries array with user.countries = ['US'], and I'm getting a NoMethodError.

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5  
It's an accessor; it doesn't matter what type it is. –  Dave Newton Sep 24 '13 at 15:40
    
If you use attr_accessor this, you will get free countries and countries= :) :) –  Arup Rakshit Sep 24 '13 at 15:42
    
How does the class need to "treat it accordingly" that is different to just user.countries = [:gb, :au]? –  Gareth Sep 24 '13 at 15:46
1  
attr_accessor provides the countries and countries= methods, but there is nothing to stop you setting @countries to something other than an array. If you want to do array things, like << and length to it then you need to write your own methods. –  Borodin Sep 24 '13 at 15:46
1  
it seems like your question is already more or less answered. But this use case that you've indicated seems more suited for a constant rather than an accessor method, imho. –  mango Sep 24 '13 at 15:51

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The type of a variable doesn't matter in Ruby.

attr_accessor just creates getter and setter methods that set and return instance variables; @countries in this case. You can set the instance variable to your array, or use the setter:

class User
  attr_accessor :countries

  def initialize
    @countries = %w[Foo Bar Baz]
    # Or...
    self.countries = %w[Foo Bar Baz]
  end
end

> puts User.new.countries
=> ["Foo", "Bar", "Baz"]

Personally I prefer using the instance variable instead of self.xxx; it's too easy to forget the self. bit and you end up setting a local variable, leaving the instance variable nil. I also think it's ugly.

If the countries won't be changing between instances, why not a constant?

Edit/Clarification

Tadman's point is well-taken, e.g., this diatribe on state. The circumtances under which I don't care about that are limited to small, self-controlled, stand-alone classes. There are inherent risks in making those assumptions, the level of those risks is project-dependent.

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Using the instance variable when you have an attr_accessor can lead to some slip-ups if you've overridden either of the getter or setter methods. If you do a lot of JavaScript where this is absolutely required, being disciplined about adding self isn't a big deal. –  tadman Sep 24 '13 at 15:54
    
@tadman Correct. If you're using attr_accessor and overriding one or the other, I'd say you're doing it wrong. IMO attr_accessor communicates that it's an accessor, not a method that performs other logic. –  Dave Newton Sep 24 '13 at 15:58
    
Well, it could be overridden in a subclass but not in the parent class. It's kind of risky to make assumptions. If you declare any kind of accessor, you should probably use it even if the instance variable is probably the same. –  tadman Sep 24 '13 at 16:06

Looks like countries should be a constant:

class User
  COUNTRIES = %w(
    AF AX AL DZ AS AD AO AI AQ AG AR AM AW AU AT AZ BS BH BD BB BY BE BZ BJ BM
    BT BO BQ BA BW BV BR IO BN BG BF BI KH CM CA CV KY CF TD CL CN CX CC CO KM
    CG CD CK CR CI HR CU CW CY CZ DK DJ DM DO EC EG SV GQ ER EE ET FK FO FJ FI
    FR GF PF TF GA GM GE DE GH GI GR GL GD GP GU GT GG GN GW GY HT HM VA HN HK
    HU IS IN ID IR IQ IE IM IL IT JM JP JE JO KZ KE KI KP KR KW KG LA LV LB LS
    LR LY LI LT LU MO MK MG MW MY MV ML MT MH MQ MR MU YT MX FM MD MC MN ME MS
    MA MZ MM NA NR NP NL NC NZ NI NE NG NU NF MP NO OM PK PW PS PA PG PY PE PH
    PN PL PT PR QA RE RO RU RW BL SH KN LC MF PM VC WS SM ST SA SN RS SC SL SG
    SX SK SI SB SO ZA GS SS ES LK SD SR SJ SZ SE CH SY TW TJ TZ TH TL TG TK TO
    TT TN TR TM TC TV UG UA AE GB US UM UY UZ VU VE VN VG VI WF EH YE ZM ZW
  ).freeze
end

User::COUNTRIES.include? "US" #=> true

freeze prevents modifications:

User::COUNTRIES.delete "US"   #=> RuntimeError: can't modify frozen Array

Update

The problem here is that your countries array has to be persisted somehow. You are mentioning has_many so Rails seems to be involved. You can use ActiveRecord's serialize method:

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  serialize :countries
end

This will save the countries attribute to the database as an object and retrieve it as such:

u = User.new
u.countries = ["US", "CA"]
u.save

u = User.last
u.countries
#=> ["US", "CA"]

It's converted to and from YAML internally, so the users table looks like:

mysql> SELECT * FROM users;
+----+-------------------+---------------------+---------------------+
| id | countries         | created_at          | updated_at          |
+----+-------------------+---------------------+---------------------+
|  1 | ---\n- US\n- CA\n | 2013-09-24 18:24:03 | 2013-09-24 18:24:03 |
+----+-------------------+---------------------+---------------------+
1 row in set (0,00 sec)
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1  
You can also make a class method to wrap this up: def self.countries; COUNTRIES; end. This might seem pointless, but it allows subclasses to override that method if required and avoids exposing the structure of this constant to other parts of your code that need access to an array. –  tadman Sep 24 '13 at 15:56
    
See comment above. Users should actually have ownership over a subset of the full list of ISO codes. Has_many is overkill for my application. –  kid_drew Sep 24 '13 at 16:11
    
@kid_drew I've updated my answer. –  Stefan Sep 24 '13 at 18:34

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