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I know the basic way to initialize arrays.I get an error on my compiler about an int array i what to initialize on a constructor that i do not understand it.I need some help. my code is:

Cpp file:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
#include "ValidationController.h"

ValidationController::ValidationController() {
    // TODO Auto-generated constructor stub
    monthTable[12]={0,3,3,6,1,4,6,2,5,0,3,5};
}

ValidationController::~ValidationController() {
    // TODO Auto-generated destructor stub
}

and the header file:

#ifndef VALIDATIONCONTROLLER_H_
#define VALIDATIONCONTROLLER_H_

class ValidationController {
public:
    int monthTable[];//={0,3,3,6,1,4,6,2,5,0,3,5};
    ValidationController();
    virtual ~ValidationController();
};

#endif /* VALIDATIONCONTROLLER_H_ */

the error i get is:

..\src\ValidationController.cpp:13: warning: extended initializer lists only available with -std=c++11 or -std=gnu++11 [enabled by default]

and

..\src\ValidationController.cpp:13: error: cannot convert '' to 'int' in assignment

I do not want to make it static. Is the there any solution that keeps the declaration to the header file?Or should i just declare it and initialize it in the .cpp file at once after imports.

share|improve this question
    
Initialize it in the constructor initializer list. –  chris Sep 24 '13 at 16:17
    
If the content of the month table does not change, then consider making it static const which allows for list initialization even in pre C++11. –  Nobody Sep 24 '13 at 16:19
    
Use std::vector instead. Also, the compiler already offered a solution in its error message: add -std=gnu++11 to your compiler flags and read about C++11 initializer lists. –  Nikos C. Sep 24 '13 at 16:21
1  
@NikosC.: If c++11 is an option then why bother with std::vector when an std::array will do? –  Nobody Sep 24 '13 at 16:26
1  
I understand that you all are angry about not professional questions but since i am not a professional programmer but i really want to learn in order to keep my jobs it is important to me when i do not find a solution to ask so i would like to ask you to remove the negative points cause i did tried and searched i gave you also a reference.Thank you anyway –  kyrpav Sep 24 '13 at 16:58

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you can use C++11 then write: In the header file: #include

class ValidationController {
public:
    std::array<int, 12> monthTable;
    ValidationController();
    virtual ~ValidationController();
};

In the source file:

ValidationController::ValidationController() 
: monthTable{0,3,3,6,1,4,6,2,5,0,3,5}
{}

or if you do not need to change the contents:

In the header file:

#include <array>

class ValidationController {
public:
    const static std::array<int, 12> monthTable;
    ValidationController();
    virtual ~ValidationController();
};

In the source file:

const std::array<int, 12> ValidationController::monthTable = {0,3,3,6,1,4,6,2,5,0,3,5};
share|improve this answer
    
how can i check that i can use C++11 cause i thought i could but i get error that i can array name at std::array can not be resolved.Even after i include the <array> –  kyrpav Sep 24 '13 at 16:55
    
@kyrpav When you add the -std=gnu++11 or -std=c++11 to the compile command and the compiler does not complain about it, then it should support it. –  Nobody Sep 24 '13 at 17:00
    
ok so what do i get error that symbol array can not be resolved? –  kyrpav Sep 24 '13 at 17:02
    
What compiler are you using and what does your compile command look like? –  Nobody Sep 24 '13 at 17:02
    
well i think you speak about: mingw and the flags are:-O0 -std=gnu++11 -g3 -Wall -c -fmessage-length=0 –  kyrpav Sep 24 '13 at 17:05

As suggested in comments, you need to make this static and initialise it in your .cpp

class ValidationController {
public:
    static int monthTable[];
    ValidationController();
    virtual ~ValidationController();
};

int ValidationController::monthTable[]={0,3,3,6,1,4,6,2,5,0,3,5};

ValidationController::ValidationController()
{
    // TODO Auto-generated constructor stub
}

ValidationController::~ValidationController() {
    // TODO Auto-generated destructor stub
}

int main()
{
    ValidationController v();
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
thank you for this solution i know how to do this as i mentioned at the question i just want to initialize it as a variable of an instance –  kyrpav Sep 24 '13 at 17:01

Both @Sodved's solution (using static) and @Nobody's solution (using Array) look very good to me. But if you insist that you don't want to make your array static or use any additional data structure, you can try this.

class ValidationController {
    public:
    int monthTable[12];
    ValidationController();
    virtual ~ValidationController();
    };


ValidationController::ValidationController()
{
    // TODO Auto-generated constructor stub
    static const int temp[12] = {0,3,3,6,1,4,6,2,5,0,3,5};
    memcpy( monthTable, temp, 12*sizeof(int) );
}

ValidationController::~ValidationController() {
    // TODO Auto-generated destructor stub
}

int main()
{
    ValidationController v;
    return 0;
}

Basically, you still keep one copy of the data in the constructor. But you will also have a copy of the data for any instance of the class ValidationController.

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