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[NOTE: I don't believe this question is a duplicate of the one linked above, as I explain in the UPDATE below.]

Is there any way to define/instantiate a generic class using reflection?

So I have a bunch of classes, each of which owns an instance of a generic class that shares the type of its owner:

public class GenericClass<T>
{
    T Owner { get; set; }
    public GenericClass(T owner) { Owner = owner; }
}
public class MyClass
{
    private GenericClass<MyClass> myGenericObject;
    public MyClass() { myGenericObject = new GenericClass<MyClass>(this); }
}

This works, but of course I have to explicitly specify "MyClass" as the argument in the GenericClass definition. I'd like to be able to do something like this:

private GenericClass<typeof(this)> myGenericObject; // Error: invalid token

Is there anyway to dynamically specify the type of the generic object at compile time, based on the containing class?


UPDATE: After reading the answers from these questions, I learned that I could instantiate a local variable like so:

var myGenericObject = Activator.CreateInstance(typeof(GenericClass<>).MakeGenericType(this.GetType()));

but, of course, the this keyword is only available inside a method (so, for example, I could put this line of code in the constructor of MyClass). But I cannot use this approach to define an instance variable (i.e., myGenericObject, in the code above). Is there any way to specify a generic instance variable dynamically?

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marked as duplicate by Alexei Levenkov, Austin Salonen, Sriram Sakthivel, wudzik, fedorqui Sep 25 '13 at 14:26

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

4  
Did you try: Activator.CreateInstance<T>(). Its built in. –  Alex Denysenko Sep 24 '13 at 18:17
2  
See stackoverflow.com/questions/1151464/… –  Ralf Sep 24 '13 at 18:19
1  
Generic class can only have generic instance field. –  Rohit Vats Sep 24 '13 at 18:24
    
@AlexDenysenko: thatnks for the tip; I'll take a look at the generic version of CreateInstance. –  kmote Sep 24 '13 at 19:42

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Regarding your update, you can pass any Type to MakeGenericType. For example, the following also works:

var myObject = new MyClass();

var myGenericObject = Activator.CreateInstance(typeof(GenericClass<>).MakeGenericType(typeof(MyClass)), myObject);

Console.WriteLine(myGenericObject.GetType());

Outputs:

ConsoleApplication1.GenericClass`1[ConsoleApplication1.MyClass]

myObject.GetType() also does the same thing:

var myGenericObject = Activator.CreateInstance(typeof(GenericClass<>).MakeGenericType(myObject.GetType()), myObject);
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Thank you, but the point is I don't want to have to explicitly specify the Type. I want it specified dynamically at compile time. –  kmote Sep 24 '13 at 19:34
    
What on earth does "dynamically at compile time" mean? Do you mean you just want to get rid of the <> from your syntax when writing programs? In that case make a static factory public static GenericClass { public Create<T>(T owner) { return new GenericClass<T>(owner); } } then you can call GenericClass.Create(myObject) and the compiler will infer the type. –  Cirdec Sep 25 '13 at 4:10
1  
Or do you really just mean "I want to make a GenericClass where the type argument is the type of it's owner", in which case you could write public static GenericClass { public object Create(object owner) { return Activator.CreateInstance(typeof(GenericClass<>).MakeGenericType(object.GetType()‌​), object); } } then you can write object myObject = new MyClass(); object gc = GenericClass.Create(object) and be confident that gc.GetType() == typeof(GenericClass<MyClass>) even though the compiler forgot everything about myObject except for the fact it's an object. –  Cirdec Sep 25 '13 at 4:14
    
(You're right that my "dynamic/compile time" comment was very poorly worded. Sorry for the confusion.) Your second comment is really getting at what I was searching for. You had a couple typos so it didn't compile at first, but essentially that's the solution I was looking for. Now the only question is: do I lose out in terms of type-safety by declaring gc as an Object rather than a GenericClass? Thanks for the help! –  kmote Sep 25 '13 at 15:19

Not sure if that is what are you looking for but can try with inheritance:

public class GenericClass<T>
{
    T Owner { get; set; }

    public GenericClass(T owner) { Owner = owner; }
}

public abstract class MyClassBase<T> where T : MyClassBase<T>
{
    protected GenericClass<T> MyGenericObject { get; private set; }

    protected MyClassBase() { MyGenericObject = new GenericClass<T>((T)this); }
}

public class MyClass1 : MyClassBase<MyClass1>
{
    public MyClass1() { }
}

public class MyClass2 : MyClassBase<MyClass2>
{
    public MyClass2() { }
}
share|improve this answer
    
interesting approach, but it doesn't seem to get around the need to specify the Type argument (in your case, to : MyClassBase<MyClass1>), whereas I was looking for a way to do so dynamically. –  kmote Sep 24 '13 at 19:38

There is static built in construct for that:

Activator.CreateInstance()

Look at the overloads.

UPDATE

public Type FakeType { get; private set; }
public T CreateInstance<T>() where T : SomeEntityBase
{
     return (T) Activator.CreateInstance(FakeType);
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Just want to point out that there is also a generic version: Activator.CreateInstance<T> msdn.microsoft.com/de-de/library/0hcyx2kd.aspx –  Boas Enkler Sep 24 '13 at 18:27
    
I did already =)) look at the comments to the question –  Alex Denysenko Sep 24 '13 at 18:28
    
I'm having a hard time understanding how to use the generic version of CreateInstance, as the sample code in the documentation doesn't actually use the construct. –  kmote Sep 24 '13 at 19:55
    
I updated the answer. Is it what you are looking for? –  Alex Denysenko Sep 24 '13 at 20:29

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