Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm tring to use join but facing this issue. I've pasted my query

select count(*) from table_a inner 
                join table_b on table_a.number = table_b.number 
                left outer join table_c on table_a.id = table_c.id 
                     and table_a.number = table_c.number 
          order by number;

pls let me know what is wrong in the query...

-Vinod

share|improve this question
    
Only odd thing is the order by - all three tables have that column, but your query will only return one row. –  OMG Ponies Dec 14 '09 at 5:10
1  
number is a reserved word so if that is actually the column name you are using, I'm not surprised it is confused. –  Gary Myers Dec 14 '09 at 6:14
    
That was spot on, Gary! I thought "number" would be contextual. He has to escape it using quotes -> "NUMBER". And the order-by part is neither going to work nor needed. –  Robert Giesecke Dec 14 '09 at 7:58

4 Answers 4

Are you executing this query as part of an INSERT or DELETE? If so, remove the ORDER BY. It's not needed anyway.

Error: ORA-00933: SQL command not properly ended

Cause: You tried to execute an SQL statement with an inappropriate clause.

Action: The options to resolve this Oracle error are:

You may have executed an INSERT statement with an ORDER BY Clause. To resolve this, remove the ORDER BY clause and re-execute the INSERT statement. For example, you tried to execute the following INSERT statement:

INSERT INTO supplier (supplier_id, supplier_name) VALUES (24553, 'IBM') ORDER BY supplier_id;

You can correct the INSERT statement by removing the ORDER BY clause as follows:

INSERT INTO supplier (supplier_id, supplier_name) VALUES (24553, 'IBM');

You may have tried to execute a DELETE statement with an ORDER BY Clause. To resolve this, remove the ORDER BY clause and re-execute the DELETE statement. For example, you tried to execute the following DELETE statement:

DELETE FROM supplier WHERE supplier_name = 'IBM' ORDER BY supplier_id;

You can correct the DELETE statement by removing the ORDER BY clause as follows:

DELETE FROM supplier WHERE supplier_name = 'IBM';

share|improve this answer
    
ORDER BY is legal on an insert statement though, and widely used for bulk loading tables in direct path mode to improve clustering factor on particular columns or to reduce index maintenance overhead (particularly on loading index-organised tables) –  David Aldridge Dec 14 '09 at 11:14

How did you execute this query?

In Oracle SQL, there's no such thing as a statement separator like ";". That one is only used in PL/SQL and some tools allow you to put more than one statement in a file/editor, when you separate them with ";". Only so that they can execute them separately.

Long story short: remove the ";" and try again. Oh and next time, tell us how you ran the query. We have to check our crystal balls to guess what your problem is.

share|improve this answer

You cannot order by a value which cannot be included in the result set. your result set aggregates multiple rows, each with its own value of NUMBER, into a single row. therefore the order by does not make logical sense. In this case your query only returns one row so ORDER BY is irrelevant.

share|improve this answer

When you transcribed your query to the anodyne test case you present here you inadvertently corrected it. Well, you introduced an ORA-00918 bug but once that is fixed the code runs fine...

SQL> create table table_a (col_1 number, id number)
  2  /

Table created.

SQL> create table table_b (col_1 number)
  2  /

Table created.

SQL> create table table_c (col_1 number, id number)
  2  /

Table created.

SQL>
SQL>
SQL> select count(*) from
  2  table_a inner join table_b on table_a.col_1 = table_b.col_1
  3  left outer join table_c on table_a.id = table_c.id
  4                         and table_a.col_1 = table_c.col_1
  5  order by col_1
  6  /
order by col_1
         *
ERROR at line 5:
ORA-00918: column ambiguously defined


SQL> select count(*) from
  2  table_a inner join table_b on table_a.col_1 = table_b.col_1
  3  left outer join table_c on table_a.id = table_c.id
  4                         and table_a.col_1 = table_c.col_1
  5  order by table_a.col_1
  6  /

  COUNT(*)
----------
         0

SQL>

Note: I have subsituted COL_1 for NUMBER as a column name. I don't think that's your problem, because using NUMBER unescaped in the query would hurl ORA-1747 not ORA-00933.

So, let's rule out the obvious: are you running on an ancient version of Oracle which doesn't support the ANSI join syntax, that is 8i or older?

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.