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I'm trying to count the occurrences of letters in a sting. I got to the part where Python does that, however, now I want that he doesn't count a letter twice if it occurs twice.

So, "My name", should give a the string '21111', instead of '211121' (so not counting both of the m's twice).

The code so far is:

for char in tested_str2: 
    if char in 'abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ': 
        x = tested_str2.count(char) 
        percentage = percentage + str(x) 
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closed as off-topic by Marcin, rds, Anand Shah, Mena, Nathan Hughes Sep 25 '13 at 15:51

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions asking for code must demonstrate a minimal understanding of the problem being solved. Include attempted solutions, why they didn't work, and the expected results. See also: Stack Overflow question checklist" – Marcin, rds, Anand Shah, Mena, Nathan Hughes
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
use a dictionary or set – khredos Sep 24 '13 at 18:53
5  
"You're trying"- so you have code that you've tried, right? Please post it. – musical_coder Sep 24 '13 at 18:53
3  
What function with "My name" as argument returns "211121"? – Nacib Neme Sep 24 '13 at 18:54
    
Questions asking for code must demonstrate a minimal understanding of the problem being solved. Include attempted solutions, why they didn't work, and the expected results. See also: Stack Overflow question checklist – Marcin Sep 24 '13 at 18:56
    
@NacibNeme He gave an example, follow the logic – khredos Sep 24 '13 at 18:58

You can use collections.Counter and set:

>>> from collections import Counter
>>> strs = ''.join(x for x in "My name" if x.isalpha()).lower()
>>> c = Counter(strs)
>>> seen = set()
>>> ''.join(str(c[item]) for item in strs 
                                      if item not in seen and not seen.add(item))
'21111'

As suggested by @DSM, instead of using a set you can also use collections.OrderedDict:

>>> from collections import OrderedDict
>>> ''.join(str(c[item]) for item in OrderedDict.fromkeys(strs))
'21111'
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1  
I think I prefer ''.join(str(c[item]) for item in OrderedDict.fromkeys(strs)) to the seen.add trick. – DSM Sep 24 '13 at 19:02
    
@DSM Good suggestion, solution updated. – Ashwini Chaudhary Sep 24 '13 at 19:07

My Python is rusty, so I'll give you the alghoritm instead of a full code solution.

  1. Loop through the characters in the string;
    1.1 Put each character you find in a hashtable/dictionary. The first time you find a character, assign a value of 1 to that entry. For every new encounter of the same character, increment this value.

  2. Create an empty string foo;

  3. Now loop through the original string again;
    3.1 For each character, append as a string to foo the value corresponding to that character in the hashtable/dictionary.

You might want to represent a single character that happens more than 9 times as something between brackets, i.e.:

How much wood would a wood chuck chuck if a wood chuck could and would chuck wood

Would lead to something that begins like:

6[12]7...

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