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So I have been working with c++ and pointers for a year and a half now, and i thought i had them succeed. I have called delete on objects many times before and the objects actually got deleted, or at least i thought they did.

The code below is just confusing the hell out of me:

#include <iostream>

class MyClass
{
public:
    int a;

    MyClass() : a(10) {
        std::cout << "constructor ran\n";
    }

    void method(std::string input_) {
        std::cout << param_ << "\n";
    }

    ~MyClass() {
        std::cout << "destructor ran\n";
    }

};

int main()
{

   MyClass* ptr = new MyClass;

   ptr->method("1");

   delete ptr;

   ptr->method("2.5");

}

this code outputs:

constructor ran
1
destructor ran
2.5

I was confused as to why it was not throwing an error of any sort - I was expecting a memory out of bounds exception or alike, but nothing. The for loop was in there incase there was some sort of hidden garbage collection, even though as far as I know there is no garbage collection in c++.

Can anyone explain as to why this code works, or where I am going wrong with this code for it not to give me the error?

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6  
It works entirely by accident. It's an error to use a pointer after you've deleted it. It may do what you think is the right thing; it may not. –  Dan Breslau Sep 24 '13 at 19:40
1  
Using a pointer after delete enters you into Undefined Behavior territory. –  kfsone Sep 24 '13 at 19:48
1  
You might want to set the pointer to the nullptr value after deleting it, to see your expected behavior. –  πάντα ῥεῖ Sep 24 '13 at 19:51

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You're misunderstanding what delete does. All delete does is call the destructor, and tell the allocator that that memory is free. It doesn't change the actual pointer. Anything beyond that is undefined.

In this case, it does nothing to the actual data pointed to. That pointer points to the same data it pointed to before, and calling methods on it works just fine. However, this behavior is not guaranteed; in fact, it's explicitly unspecified. delete could zero out the data; or the allocator could allocate that same memory for something else, or the compiler could just refuse to compile this.

C++ allows you to do many unsafe things, in the interest of performance. This is one of them. If you want to avoid this kind of mistake, it's a good idea to do:

delete ptr;
ptr = NULL;

to ensure that you don't try to reuse the pointer, and will crash immediately if you do rather than having undefined behavior.

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2  
"calling methods on it works just fine" Not accurate, there is a truckload of cases where it wouldn't "work just fine". The whole point, as others have mentioned, is that UB is allowed to do anything including appearing to work. –  syam Sep 24 '13 at 19:43
    
@syam I mean it works fine in the case that he's demonstrating, not that it's a fine thing to do. I've expanded my answer to clarify. I tend to find that explaining what's actually happening (the runtime is simply leaving the data alone, and when you call the method it operates just as it would before the delete) is more helpful than just saying that it's undefined behavior and anything could happen (though the latter is technically correct). –  Brian Campbell Sep 24 '13 at 19:44
    
@syam I've added further explanation to clarify that the behavior is undefined. –  Brian Campbell Sep 24 '13 at 19:48
    
Well the problem with explaining what happens is indeed that it's not universally correct: on another implementation it might not do the same. Hence my nitpicking. ;) Another compiler might order a pizza or format your hard drive and it would still conform to the standard (but you already know that, I'm mostly commenting for the benefit of OP). –  syam Sep 24 '13 at 19:48
1  
@Gunshin Yeah, there are some errors that are caught, such as trying to access null pointers (or pointers that are a small offset from NULL). And accessing memory that has not been mapped is an error. But there's no guarantees that accessing an invalid pointer will cause an error; this is why C and C++ are considered "unsafe" or "unmanaged" languages, while languages like Java or C# are considered "safe" or "managed" languages as they don't allow you to do this. –  Brian Campbell Sep 24 '13 at 19:56

Calling ptr->method("2.5") after delete ptr has undefined behaviour. This means anything can happen, including what you're observing.

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In this code:

MyClass* ptr = new MyClass;
ptr->method("1");
delete ptr;
ptr->method("2.5");

you are accessing the memory that has already been freed, which yields undefined behavior, which means that anything can happen including the worst case: that it seems to work correctly.

That's one of the reasons why it is a good practice to set such a pointer to NULL rather than allowing this kind of stuff happen:

delete ptr;
ptr = NULL;

although the best thing to do is to completely avoid using pointers if possible.

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you are accessing the memory, which is not reset until it is used by another new call or so.. however it is a good practice every time you call delete, is to set the pointer to NULL.

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