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Can someone provide an example and explain when and how to use Twisted's DeferredLock.

I have a DeferredQueue and I think I have a race condition I want to prevent, but I'm unsure how to combine the two.

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nice, didn't even know DeferredLock existed. this could have come in handy for me, I ended up having to essentially implement it myself albeit with a different paradigm.. –  Claudiu Sep 24 '13 at 22:44
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1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Use a DeferredLock when you have a critical section that is asynchronous and needs to be protected from overlapping (one might say "concurrent") execution.

Here is an example of such an asynchronous critical section:

class NetworkCounter(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self._count = 0

    def next(self):
        self._count += 1
        recording = self._record(self._count)
        def recorded(ignored):
            return self._count
        recording.addCallback(recorded)
        return recording

    def _record(self, value):
        return http.GET(
            b"http://example.com/record-count?value=%d" % (value,))

See how two concurrent uses of the next method will produce "corrupt" results:

from __future__ import print_function

counter = NetworkCounter()
d1 = counter.next()
d2 = counter.next()

d1.addCallback(print, "d1")
d2.addCallback(print, "d2")

Gives the result:

2 d1
2 d2

This is because the second call to NetworkCounter.next begins before the first call to that method has finished using the _count attribute to produce its result. The two operations share the single attribute and produce incorrect output as a consequence.

Using a DeferredLock instance will solve this problem by preventing the second operation from beginning until the first operation has completed. You can use it like this:

class NetworkCounter(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self._count = 0
        self._lock = DeferredLock()

    def next(self):
        return self._lock.run(self._next)

    def _next(self):
        self._count += 1
        recording = self._record(self._count)
        def recorded(ignored):
            return self._count
        recording.addCallback(recorded)
        return recording

    def _record(self, value):
        return http.GET(
            b"http://example.com/record-count?value=%d" % (value,))

First, notice that the NetworkCounter instance creates its own DeferredLock instance. Each instance of DeferredLock is distinct and operates independently from any other instance. Any code that participates in the use of a critical section needs to use the same DeferredLock instance in order for that critical section to be protected. If two NetworkCounter instances somehow shared state then they would also need to share a DeferredLock instance - not create their own private instance.

Next, see how DeferredLock.run is used to call the new _next method (into which all of the application logic has been moved). NetworkCounter (nor the application code using NetworkCounter) does not call the method that contains the critical section. DeferredLock is given responsibility for doing this. This is how DeferredLock can prevent the critical section from being run by multiple operations at the "same" time. Internally, DeferredLock will keep track of whether an operation has started and not yet finished. It can only keep track of operation completion if the operation's completion is represented as a Deferred though. If you are familiar with Deferreds, you probably already guessed that the (hypothetical) HTTP client API in this example, http.GET, is returning a Deferred that fires when the HTTP request has completed. If you are not familiar with them yet, you should go read about them now.

Once the Deferred that represents the result of the operation fires - in other words, once the operation is done, DeferredLock will consider the critical section "out of use" and allow another operation to begin executing it. It will do this by checking to see if any code has tried to enter the critical section while the critical section was in use and if so it will run the function for that operation.

Third, notice that in order to serialize access to the critical section, DeferredLock.run must return a Deferred. If the critical section is in use and DeferredLock.run is called it cannot start another operation. Therefore, instead, it creates and returns a new Deferred. When the critical section goes out of use, the next operation can start and when that operation completes, the Deferred returned by the DeferredLock.run call will get its result. This all ends up looking rather transparent to any users who are already expecting a Deferred - it just means the operation appears to take a little longer to complete (though the truth is that it likely takes the same amount of time to complete but has it wait a while before it starts - the effect on the wall clock is the same though).

Of course, you can achieve a concurrent-use safe NetworkCounter more easily than all this by simply not sharing state in the first place:

class NetworkCounter(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self._count = 0

    def next(self):
        self._count += 1
        result = self._count
        recording = self._record(self._count)
        def recorded(ignored):
            return result
        recording.addCallback(recorded)
        return recording

    def _record(self, value):
        return http.GET(
            b"http://example.com/record-count?value=%d" % (value,))

This version moves the state used by NetworkCounter.next to produce a meaningful result for the caller out of the instance dictionary (ie, it is no longer an attribute of the NetworkCounter instance) and into the call stack (ie, it is now a closed over variable associated with the actual frame that implements the method call). Since each call creates a new frame and a new closure, concurrent calls are now independent and no locking of any sort is required.

Finally, notice that even though this modified version of NetworkCounter.next still uses self._count which is shared amongst all calls to next on a single NetworkCounter instance this can't cause any problems for the implementation when it is used concurrently. In a cooperative multitasking system such as the one primarily used with Twisted, there are never context switches in the middle of functions or operations. There cannot be a context switch from one operation to another in between the self._count += 1 and result = self._count lines. They will always execute atomically and you don't need locks around them to avoid re-entrancy or concurrency induced corruption.

These last two points - avoiding concurrency bugs by avoiding shared state and the atomicity of code inside a function - combined means that DeferredLock isn't often particularly useful. As a single data point, in the roughly 75 KLOC in my current work project (heavily Twisted based), there are no uses of DeferredLock.

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As always, thank you for the masterful explanation Jean-Paul! –  Ben DeMott Sep 24 '13 at 23:00
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