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I have an item in a collection I need to modify using reflection - I'm using reflection because I don't know the exact type of the generic collection until runtime.

I know how to use the SetValue() method to set the value of a property retrieved through collection, but can I use SetValue() to set an actual object inside a collection?

IEnumerable businessObjectCollection = businessObject as IEnumerable;

foreach (Object o in businessObjectCollection)
{
    // I want to set the "o" here to some replacement object in the collection if
    // a property on the object equals something
    Type t = o.GetType();
    PropertyInfo identifierProperty = o.GetType().GetProperty("Identifier");
    long entityID = (long)identifierProperty.GetValue(o, null);


    if (replacementEntity.Identifier == entityID)
    {
        // IN THIS CASE: set "o" to be the replacementEntity object
        // defined somewhere else. 

        // I can retrieve the object itself using this code, but
        // would I set the object with SetValue?
        object item = businessObjectCollection.GetType().GetMethod("get_Item").Invoke(businessObjectCollection, new object[] { 1 });                              
    }

}
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2  
Do you even know that your collection will be modifiable? –  Jon Skeet Sep 24 '13 at 19:51
    
What type is businessObjectCollection? IEnumerable cannot be modified. You must change IEnumerable to IList or ICollection if you want to assume you have the ability to modify it. –  Trevor Elliott Sep 24 '13 at 19:53
4  
You're setting an item in a collection whilst iterating through it with a foreach; that's bad juju right there, and will likely end up in an exception telling you "C# Collection was modified; enumeration operation may not execute." –  Allan Elder Sep 24 '13 at 19:53
    
Can you substitute the reference to the collection? i.e. replace businessObjectCollection with a new object? If so there might be a couple of ways of doing this without modifying the original (potentially unmodifiable) object. –  OlduwanSteve Sep 24 '13 at 19:58

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Well, you use get_Item to retrieve it so you should be able to call set_Item to set it:

businessObjectCollection.GetType().GetMethod("set_Item").Invoke(businessObjectCollection, new object[] { 1, replacementEntity });

Note that this will explode if the collection is not of a type supporting indexed access.

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Ended up using this - worked great for my purpose. –  Dustin Kofoed Sep 24 '13 at 23:22
collection.GetType().GetProperty("Item").SetValue(collection, o, new object[] { 1 })
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Rather than attempt to modify the enumerable, you could replace it with a new enumerable that performs the replacement inline. It really depends what you're doing with it afterwards though so YMMV.

IEnumerable newCollection = businessObjectCollection.Cast<object>().Select((o) =>
{
    Type t = o.GetType();
    PropertyInfo identifierProperty = o.GetType().GetProperty("Identifier");
    long entityID = (long)identifierProperty.GetValue(o, null);

    if (replacementEntity.Identifier == entityID)
    {
        return replacementEntity;
    }
    return o;
});
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Oh man, this is SOOOO close!! It is doing exactly what I'm looking for, except I can't assign this new IEnumerable to my secondary object to replace the collection (an exception occurs stating that object of type IEnumerable cannot be converted to a generic list type). Is there a way to convert this IEnumerable into a generic list of the type I'm looking for at runtime? –  Dustin Kofoed Sep 24 '13 at 21:14
    
I think I'd have to know a lot more about what you're doing with it. If the outcome of this operation needs to be mutable later then it seems the route you've chosen is going to be better. It does beg the question why the object is going from list -> enumerable -> list, but that's not really in the scope of answering this question :) –  OlduwanSteve Sep 25 '13 at 9:32

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