Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

I've made a site 1 year ago using php, when I had alot less experience. My teacher and I were analysing the code today and there seems to be a security issue. He wants me to fix it before he gives me the points I need.

I've got an index.php and an edit.php file in the root directory, and a login page in /php/login.php (which I find to be a very silly place to put a login file in, now that I look back on it, I would probably swap edit.php's and login.php's directory's if I were to rewrite my site).

Basically, I want these three files to be accessible externally. I want all other php files to be restricted from the outside, so it's impossible to do an ajax call to /php/phpsavefile.php from outside the system (which is the security issue I mentioned). edit.php makes the ajax call to /php/savefile.php.

I think this is what I need to get the job done:

Order Deny,Allow
Deny from all
Allow from 127.0.0.1

<Files /index.php>
    Order Allow,Deny
    Allow from all
</Files>

But how can I add three files instead of just one after <Files and before >?

I've also tried second approach:

Order Deny,Allow
Deny from all 

This doesn't seem to work because an ajax call appears to be a regular http request as well, so it gets a 403 response.

Another approach I tried was putting the restricted php files inside a map called "private" in the same folder where "httpdocs" remains (the parent folder of webroot). My teacher had told me about an admin folder, that no one can access but the site itsself. I tried including the restricted php files inside the private folder, but it didn't seem to include it properly...

Any help or tips for this novice at .htaccess would be appreciated :-)

Edit:

.htaccess allow access to files only from includes

Ray's comment said:

Of course, because they are requested by the client. You can't "allow the client" and "not allow the client" to serve files.

I suppose this is true, but how can I prevent people from calling my ajax file?

share|improve this question
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I secured it by checking if the user was logged in.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.