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Ok guys, I'll try to explain my problem in a very complete form. I'm using one DLL injected in another process (injected using VirtualAllocEx/WriteProcessMemory/CreateRemoteThread but this don't really matter) and this DLL when run in the EntryPoint have only one thing:

procedure EntryPoint(Reason: integer);
begin
  if Reason = DLL_PROCESS_ATTACH then
    begin
      MyMainThread.Create;
    end

Ok, so all my work is being done inside this MyMainThread (TThread)... What I do in MyMainThread is basically set 2 timers, and hook the keyboard events using SetWindowsHookEx (WH_KEYBOARD_LL). Everything is working fine when separately, this is: or the SetWindowsHookEx or the 2 timers... When I get both things together for some unknown reason the hook works for few characters typed in keyboard (less than 10) and the timers just stops, but the MyMainThread doesn't terminate. My tests on Windows 7 / 2008 was perfectly, but when running in Windows 2003 the problems started. MyMainThread Execute is this:

procedure MyMainThread.Execute;
begin
  while not Terminated do
    begin
      MyThread:= Self;
      StartKeyboardHook;
      StartUp;
      SetTimer(0, 0, 600000, @MyMainThread.ContactHome);
      SetTimer(0, 0, 40000, @MyMainThread.MapProc);
      CreateMessagePump;
    end;
end;

The 2 timers and the 'StartUp' do things like contact one php via Indy doing POST/GET requests, list the processes running, and things like this... And the StartKeyboardHook is simple like this:

procedure MyMainThread.StartKeyboardHook;
begin
  if llKeyboardHook = 0 then
    llKeyboardHook:= SetWindowsHookEx(WH_KEYBOARD_LL, @LowLevelKeyboardHook, HInstance, 0);
end;

As you can see, this StartKeyboardHook is inside MyMainThread and llKeyboardHook/LowLevelKeyboardHook are global var/method... If I put LowLevelKeyboardHook procedure inside the thread just don't work the hook. I believe the problem is not in my LowLevelKeyboardHook (the code itself) because as I said, if I don't setup the 2 timers, the hook works perfectly, but if you want I can post it here. As I said, the hook is started inside the thread, but the callback procedure and hhook variable are global (maybe that's the problem)... The CreateMessagePump (last call in thread's Execute) procedure is necessary for the timers and for the hook, since it's LowLevel hook I need a message queue. Why am I getting this instability (for what my tests show only in Win2k3), and if I put only Keyboard Hook without timers, or only timers without hook, everything works? The MessagePump is:

procedure MyMainThread.CreateMessagePump;
var
  AppMsg: TMsg;
begin
  while GetMessage(AppMsg, 0, 0, 0) do
    begin
      TranslateMessage(AppMsg);
      DispatchMessage(AppMsg);
    end;
  //if needed to quit this procedure use PostQuitMessage(0);
end;
share|improve this question
    
It's almost as if the last question that you asked never happened. You still appear to be passing instance methods to the timer, and your thread's execute method runs for ever. –  David Heffernan Sep 24 '13 at 21:02
    
I need to take sometime to try again this timer solution we discuss in another thread, but I'll need to open a question here and ask you why I'm getting errors because I tried exactly what that guy said and didn't worked... Anyway you believe the error in the hook is because of this?? –  user1526124 Sep 24 '13 at 21:28
    
Sertac's code works. It's your use of it that is wrong. Are the timer procs instance methods? –  David Heffernan Sep 24 '13 at 21:36
    
We keep coming back to your use of @ to get procedural variables. There are three uses in this question. We cannot see any of the procedures so nobody but you can check the validity. Since you used @ the compiler won't check. If you used sertacs code, and the compiler would not accept your code, that means your code is wrong. Simply suppressing that warning doesn't make the code right. Show the missing code please. –  David Heffernan Sep 24 '13 at 22:03
1  
It's kind of hard to believe that you did like the guy said, it's been just a few hours that David demonstrated with code example how you would like the thread's execute method. Yet, here's the return of the while loop turned into something worse, it will try to run forever now. –  Sertac Akyuz Sep 25 '13 at 1:14

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Some very general advice first.

You asked a question, your previous question, about how to organise the thread's Execute method. The answer I gave you then was accurate. You should heed it.

At each and every question that you have asked on this topic myself, Sertac and others have told you about the problems of mis-matching function declarations for Win32 callbacks. It seems like you did not heed the advice. You continue to use the broken API declarations provided by the RTL, and the @ operator. In a previous question, Sertac showed you how to correct the failings of the RTL declarations. If you cannot check that your callbacks match then you must let the compiler do that.

You said in comments that you tried Sertac's type safe SetTimer, but it "didn't work". That is a mis-diagnosis. Sertac's code worked perfectly. The error you received was from the compiler checking that your callback was declared correctly. Since it was not, the compiler stopped. That is the desired behaviour. You chose to ignore the compiler, suppress the error, and continue with the broken callback. The correct response would have been to fix your callback.

It is rather pointless for you to keep asking questions, receive advice, fail to heed that advice, and then ask the same question over and again. You must heed the advice if you want to make progress. Why even ask if you won't do that?


As for the detail here, I see two main problems:

  1. The thread loop never terminates. Use the exact loop that I gave you in your previous question. Rather than just copying it, try to understand how it works and why it is right.

  2. Your timer call back functions do not match the required signatures. They cannot be instance methods (or class methods for that matter). They should be functions declared at unit scope. They must be stdcall. The parameter lists must match. Since you are finding it hard to meet these requirements it will be best if you use Sertac's code from your earlier question and get the compiler to enforce the type safety.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes David I already fix my thread loop... And I'll right now get back to the old thread where Sertac re-declare the SetTimer to try again remove this '@' and make it the correct way, should I post the errors in that topic or here? –  user1526124 Sep 25 '13 at 11:48
    
Post here I think. –  David Heffernan Sep 25 '13 at 12:06
    
Here type TFnTimerProc = procedure (hwnd: HWND; uMsg: UINT; idEvent: UIntPtr; dwTime: DWORD); stdcall; I get: Undeclared identifier UIntPtr. –  user1526124 Sep 25 '13 at 12:35
    
Which Delphi version? If it's an old version, use DWORD –  David Heffernan Sep 25 '13 at 12:57
    
@DavidHeffernan : <They cannot be instance methods (or class methods for that matter).. Are you Sure about that ? .. check my example. –  S.MAHDI Sep 25 '13 at 13:14

Firstly : Using global variable to contact a thread is not a recommended solution .. you are using LowLevelKeyboardHook as a global procedure .you should declare LowLevelKeyboardHook into your main thread : unfortunately you can not declare a callback function into an object (Class,Object,Thread,..),So you need to make your LowLevelKeyboardHook as a class function and of course it should be static function .(or you can use MakeObjectInstance function to create an object from the callback function. ):

   TMyMainThread = class(TThread)
  private
  class var
    llKeyboardHook: HHook;

  public
    constructor Create(CreateSuspended: Boolean); overload;
    destructor Destroy; override;
  protected
    procedure Execute; override;
    class function LowLevelKeyboardHook(Code: Integer; wParam: wParam;
      lParam: lParam): LRESULT; stdcall; static;
  end;

now you can set your hook :

 llKeyboardHook := SetWindowsHookEx(WH_KEYBOARD_LL,
        @TMyMainThread.LowLevelKeyboardHook, HInstance, 0);

secondly: your thread's execute method runs for ever, and when its run every time it call SetTimer..you should call Settimer only once ..

procedure TMyMainThread.Execute;
begin
  while not Terminated do
    begin
    {Set FirstTime to true on TMyMainThread.Create}
      if FirstTime then
        begin
          FirstTime := False;
          SetTimer();
          ...
        end;
    end;
end;
share|improve this answer
    
I thought the thread was inside the infinity loop from CreateMessagePump and not re-executing the Execute method... –  user1526124 Sep 24 '13 at 23:58
    
Yes, you are right .. ,but what will be hapen if your app call PostQuitMessage ? . it is better to use Variable rather than loop .. –  S.MAHDI Sep 25 '13 at 1:02
    
This answer just suggests alternative ways to do the same as in the question. The Execute method you offer is worse than in the question. And you fixed the keyboard hook callback but it was not broken. Using global variables as per question is fine. Only one thread is ever created. What is broken is the timer callbacks but you did not mention them. In short you seem to have introduced distraction and confusion. –  David Heffernan Sep 25 '13 at 8:17
    
@David Heffernan : yes i forget talking about the SetTimer .. you are right ..But Why you are saying that The Execute method is worse ? –  S.MAHDI Sep 25 '13 at 13:11
    
Read user's previous question –  David Heffernan Sep 25 '13 at 13:55

Another way to make a callback function works inside Class: i will take SetTimer as example : Firstly we can declare the callback function inside our class :

type
  TForm3 = class(TForm)
    Button1: TButton;
    ListBox1: TListBox;
    Button2: TButton;
    ListBox2: TListBox;
    procedure Button1Click(Sender: TObject);
    procedure Button2Click(Sender: TObject);
  private
    { Private declarations }
    IDTimer, IDTimer2: DWORD;
    FObj: Pointer;
    procedure FTimerMethod2(var Message: TTimerStruct);
    procedure FTimerMethod(_hwnd: HWND; uMsg: UINT; idEvent: UINT_PTR;
      dwTime: DWORD); stdcall;
  public
    { Public declarations }
  end;

then ,handling the function :

procedure TForm3.FTimerMethod(_hwnd: HWND; uMsg: UINT; idEvent: UINT_PTR;
  dwTime: DWORD); stdcall;
begin
  { Note : you can not access function params correctly }
  { & you should use Form3.ListBox2.Items to access the ListBox
    instead of ListBox2.Items .
  }
  {
    this Code will not work :
    ListBox2.Items.add(IntToStr(_hwnd)); !!!

  }
  Form3.ListBox2.Items.add(IntToStr(_hwnd));
end;

But be careful you can not access function params, and you need to specify the global variable (Form3) that hold the object that you want to contact with it (ListBox2). i think that this method will only works on Settimer callback function .

Secondly : using MakeXObjectInstance to create an object from our callback function : that's mean that our callback function will be copied inside the class .. we call firstly the callback function normally then we translate all function parameters to our function inside TObject Class : add this unit first :

unit uTimer;
{uTimer Unit by S.Mahdi}
interface

uses Windows;

type

  TTimerStruct = record
    _hwnd: HWND;
    uMsg: UINT;
    idEvent: UINT_PTR;
    dwTime: DWORD;

  end;

type
  TTimerMethod = procedure(var Message: TTimerStruct) of object;

function MakeTimerObjectInstance(const AMethod: TTimerMethod): Pointer;
procedure FreeTimerObjectInstance(ObjectInstance: Pointer);

implementation

type
  PObjectInstance = ^TObjectInstance;

  TObjectInstance = packed record
    Code: Byte;
    Offset: Integer;
    case Integer of
      0:
        (Next: PObjectInstance);
      1:
        (FMethod: TMethod);
  end;

const
{$IF Defined(CPUX86)}
  CodeBytes = 2;
{$ELSEIF Defined(CPUX64)}
  CodeBytes = 8;
{$ENDIF CPU}
  InstanceCount = (4096 - SizeOf(Pointer) * 2 - CodeBytes)
    div SizeOf(TObjectInstance) - 1;

type
  PInstanceBlock = ^TInstanceBlock;

  TInstanceBlock = packed record
    Next: PInstanceBlock;
    Code: array [1 .. CodeBytes] of Byte;
    WndProcPtr: Pointer;
    Instances: array [0 .. InstanceCount] of TObjectInstance;
  end;

var
  InstBlockList: PInstanceBlock;
  InstFreeList: PObjectInstance;

function CalcJmpOffset(Src, Dest: Pointer): Longint;
begin
  Result := IntPtr(Dest) - (IntPtr(Src) + 5);
end;

procedure StdTimerProc(_hwnd: HWND; uMsg: UINT; idEvent: UINT_PTR;
  dwTime: DWORD); stdcall;
var
  TimerStruct: TTimerStruct;
{$IF Defined(CPUX86)}
  { In    ECX = Address of method pointer }
  asm
    PUSH EBX
    PUSH EDX
    MOV EBX,_hwnd
    XOR EDX,EDX
    LEA EDX,TimerStruct
    MOV [EDX].TTimerStruct._hwnd,EBX;
    MOV EBX,uMsg
    MOV [EDX].TTimerStruct.uMsg,EBX;
    MOV EBX,idEvent
    MOV [EDX].TTimerStruct.idEvent,EBX;
    MOV EBX,dwTime
    MOV [EDX].TTimerStruct.dwTime,EBX;
    PUSH EDX
    MOV     EAX,[ECX].Longint[4]
    CALL    [ECX].Pointer
    POP EDX
    POP EBX
    (* XOR     EAX,EAX
    PUSH    EAX
    PUSH    dwTime
    PUSH    idEvent
    PUSH    uMsg
    PUSH    _hwnd
    MOV     EDX,ESP
    MOV     EAX,[ECX].Longint[4]
    CALL    [ECX].Pointer
    ADD     ESP,16
    POP     EAX *)
end;
{$ELSEIF Defined(CPUX64)}
  { In    R11 = Address of method pointer }
  asm
    .PARAMS 1
    MOV TimerStruct._hwnd,_hwnd;
    MOV TimerStruct.uMsg,uMsg;
    MOV TimerStruct.idEvent,idEvent;
    MOV TimerStruct.dwTime,dwTime;
    LEA RDX,TimerStruct
    PUSH RCX
    PUSH R11
    MOV     RCX,[R11].TMethod.Data
    CALL    [R11].TMethod.Code
    POP R11
    POP RCX
end;
{$ENDIF CPUX64}

function MakeTimerObjectInstance(const AMethod: TTimerMethod): Pointer;
const
  BlockCode: array [1 .. CodeBytes] of Byte = (
{$IF Defined(CPUX86)}
    $59, { POP ECX }
    $E9); { JMP StdTimerProc }
{$ELSEIF Defined(CPUX64)}
    $41, $5B, { POP R11 }
    $FF, $25, $00, $00, $00, $00)
  ; { JMP [RIP+0] }
{$ENDIF}
  PageSize = 4096;
var
  Block: PInstanceBlock;
  Instance: PObjectInstance;
begin
  if InstFreeList = nil then
    begin
      Block := VirtualAlloc(nil, PageSize, MEM_COMMIT, PAGE_EXECUTE_READWRITE);
      Block^.Next := InstBlockList;
      Move(BlockCode, Block^.Code, SizeOf(BlockCode));
{$IF Defined(CPUX86)}
      Block^.WndProcPtr := Pointer(CalcJmpOffset(@Block^.Code[2],
        @StdTimerProc));
{$ELSEIF Defined(CPUX64)}
      Block^.WndProcPtr := @StdTimerProc;
{$ENDIF}
      Instance := @Block^.Instances;
      repeat
        Instance^.Code := $E8; { CALL NEAR PTR Offset }
        Instance^.Offset := CalcJmpOffset(Instance, @Block^.Code);
        Instance^.Next := InstFreeList;
        InstFreeList := Instance;
        Inc(PByte(Instance), SizeOf(TObjectInstance));
      until IntPtr(Instance) - IntPtr(Block) >= SizeOf(TInstanceBlock);
      InstBlockList := Block;
    end;
  Result := InstFreeList;
  Instance := InstFreeList;
  InstFreeList := Instance^.Next;
  Instance^.FMethod := TMethod(AMethod);
end;

procedure FreeTimerObjectInstance(ObjectInstance: Pointer);
begin
  if ObjectInstance <> nil then
    begin
      PObjectInstance(ObjectInstance)^.Next := InstFreeList;
      InstFreeList := ObjectInstance;
    end;
end;

end.

And this is a simple example of how to use both method :

unit uMain;

interface

uses
  Winapi.Windows, Winapi.Messages, System.SysUtils, System.Variants,
  System.Classes, Vcl.Graphics,
  Vcl.Controls, Vcl.Forms, Vcl.Dialogs, Vcl.StdCtrls,
  uTimer;

type
  TForm3 = class(TForm)
    Button1: TButton;
    ListBox1: TListBox;
    Button2: TButton;
    ListBox2: TListBox;
    procedure Button1Click(Sender: TObject);
    procedure Button2Click(Sender: TObject);
  private
    { Private declarations }
    IDTimer, IDTimer2: DWORD;
    FObj: Pointer;
    procedure FTimerMethod(_hwnd: HWND; uMsg: UINT; idEvent: UINT_PTR;
      dwTime: DWORD); stdcall;

    procedure FTimerMethod2(var Message: TTimerStruct);
  public
    { Public declarations }
  end;

var
  Form3: TForm3;

implementation

{$R *.dfm}

procedure TForm3.Button2Click(Sender: TObject);
begin
  KillTimer(Handle, IDTimer);
  FreeTimerObjectInstance(FObj);
end;

procedure TForm3.FTimerMethod(_hwnd: HWND; uMsg: UINT; idEvent: UINT_PTR;
  dwTime: DWORD); stdcall;
begin
  { Note : you can not access function params correctly }
  { & you should use Form3.ListBox2.Items to access the ListBox
    instead of ListBox2.Items .
  }
  {
    this Code will not work :
    ListBox2.Items.add(IntToStr(_hwnd)); !!!

  }
  Form3.ListBox2.Items.add(IntToStr(_hwnd));
end;

procedure TForm3.FTimerMethod2(var Message: TTimerStruct);
begin
  ListBox1.Items.add(IntToStr(Message._hwnd));
end;

procedure TForm3.Button1Click(Sender: TObject);
begin
  ReportMemoryLeaksOnShutdown := True;
  FObj := MakeTimerObjectInstance(FTimerMethod2);
  IDTimer := SetTimer(Handle, 0, 1000, FObj);
  IDTimer2 := SetTimer(Handle, 1, 1000, @TForm3.FTimerMethod);

end;

end.
share|improve this answer
    
- "{ Note : you can not access function params correctly }" - Isn't it telling you something? .. that what you're doing cannot be correct? –  Sertac Akyuz Sep 25 '13 at 16:41
    
@Sertac Akyuz : I mentioned two methods ..the second method works correctly . –  S.MAHDI Sep 25 '13 at 17:11
1  
@S. Then you'd better remove that note from the second method. I'd also remove the first method altogether.. –  Sertac Akyuz Sep 25 '13 at 17:19
    
@Sertac Akyuz : i just removed the Note from the Second function . –  S.MAHDI Sep 25 '13 at 17:40

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