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From what I understand IDIV stores the quotient in the AX register and the remainder in the DX register, but for some reason the value in DX is not the correct value of the remainder.

EX: (9/5=1.8) Correct me if I'm wrong but doesn't the DX register hold the value 8?

Here is my code:

       .MODEL  SMALL,BASIC,FARSTACK                                       
       EXTRN   GETDEC:FAR                  
       EXTRN   PUTDEC:FAR          
       EXTRN   PUTSTRNG:FAR       
       .STACK  256

       .CONST

PROMPT  DB      'ENTER SIGNED NUMBER   '

ANNOTATION   DB      'VALUE:                '

       .CODE
code:

       MOV     AX,SEG DGROUP       
       MOV     ES,AX   

       LEA     DI,PROMPT           
       MOV     CX,22
       CALL    PUTSTRNG
       CALL    GETDEC  

;I just enter 1 so AX=1 but the code is used for solving simple arithmetic problems (decimal * 9/5)                 

       MOV     BX,9
       IMUL    BX
       MOV     BX,5
       IDIV    BX

       MOV     AX,DX ;Right here is where I check what's inside DX, I get a value of 4
                      not 8

       LEA     DI,ANNOTATION       
       MOV     CX,22
       CALL    PUTSTRNG
       MOV     BH,0
       CALL    PUTDEC


       .EXIT                      
END     code

Any help would be appreciated.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I think you may be misunderstanding integer division, quotients and remainders. For the example you give, 9/5, the quotient is 1, and the remainder is 4.

If you think back to how you learned about division in elementary school, 9/5 = 1 remainder 4, because 5 divides into 9 only once, leaving a remainder of 4.

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