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I have a piece of code like this:

public class UserCache
{
    private Dictionary<int, User> _users = new Dictionary<int, User>();

    public User GetUser(int id)
    {
        User u = null;

        lock (_users)
        {
            if (_users.containsKey(id))
                return _users[id];
        }

        //The below line is threadsafe, so no worries on that.
        u = RetrieveUser(id); // Method to retrieve from database;

        lock (_users)
        {
            _users.Add(id, u);
        }

        return u;
    }
}

I'm locking the access to dictionary, however someone in my team told that its still not threadsafe(without an explanation). Question is - do you think this is thread safe at all?

Edit: Forgot to ask,what a solution would look like.Please note that I'mnot looking to lock the whole method, as the retrieve user is a time consuming operation.

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Looks okay to me, is it just this particular code or is there some other code that might have a problem? –  Jesus Ramos Sep 24 '13 at 22:00
    
Better if you use ConcurrentDictionary - Not sure why this code is not thread-safe –  Habib Sep 24 '13 at 22:00
    
You may want to make _users readonly as well –  sehe Sep 24 '13 at 22:02
    
Idon't think you have more choice here because the result of As –  Kamel BRAHIM Sep 24 '13 at 22:32
    
If you want the dictionary to be thread safe then why dont you just create a prop for the dictionary and lock its Set? –  Ronald Estacion Sep 25 '13 at 2:25

4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

No, it's not thread-safe. Imagine it's called twice at the same time with the same ID, which isn't previously present.

Both threads would get as far as RetrieveUser, and they'd both call _users.Add(id, u). The second call would fail because the key would already exist in the dictionary.

(As an aside, I'd strongly recommend using braces for locks, if statements etc, for the sake of readability.)

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Did you mean would fail because the key would already exist in the dictionary ? –  Mike Sep 24 '13 at 22:11
    
Obviously. Also, this is known as a race condition –  sehe Sep 24 '13 at 22:19
    
Ok, so what you are saying is there is chance of getting an exception since add might get called twice for the same id, and instead if I use _users[id] = u, this should be fine? –  Mike Sep 24 '13 at 22:21
    
I might be wrong but I think it depends on what thread safety means. OP will never get a wrong result from the code in the question. (ignoring unnecessary db calls and exceptions) –  I4V Sep 24 '13 at 22:33
2  
@I4V Throwing an exception that could only ever happen in multi-threaded code probably qualifies as "not threadsafe". If the code was using _users[id] = u on the other hand I'd agree. –  Voo Sep 24 '13 at 22:35

It is threadsafe in the sense that it will not corrupt any data structures. It is not thread-safe in the sense that the entire method behaves atomically. Two threads might find the item to be missing, then create it then add it. One of the adders will fail.

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Idon't think you have more choice here because the result of _users.Add(id,u) depend on RetrieveUser you have to lock all method to make it thread safe. may be john skeet can confirm this
the solution may look like this

public class UserCache
 {
  private Dictionary<int, User> _users = new Dictionary<int, User>();
 private readonly object _syncLock = new object(); 
 public User GetUser(int id)
{
   User u = null;

    lock (_syncLock)
    { 

        if (_users.containsKey(id))
            return _users[id];


    //The below line is threadsafe, so no worries on that.
    u = RetrieveUser(id); // Method to retrieve from database;


        _users.Add(id, u);
    }

    return u;
}

}

hope this help

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I think you must apply the singleton pattern to have a really thread safe code. In this moment you can have 2 instances of your class.

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This isn't even attempting to be a singleton... –  Marc Gravell Sep 24 '13 at 22:04
    
And there's absolutely no requirement to use singletons in order to have thread-safe code, fortunately. –  Jon Skeet Sep 24 '13 at 22:08

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