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I am trying to write a method that will terminate a service on a remote system, by process ID, if it fails to stop using the StopService method. I have tried two different ways of invoking the "Terminate" method on a ManagementObject, and I get two different errors. It's also important to me that I be able to get the return code from the Terminate method.

If I declare a ManagementPath directly to the process I want to terminate, I get the error "System.Management.ManagementException: Invalid object path" at line:

ManagementBaseObject processParams = processObj.InvokeMethod("Terminate", (ManagementBaseObject)null, null);

If I get a ManagementObjectCollection and loop through it looking for the Process ID I want to terminate, I get the error "Invalid parameter" at line:

ManagementBaseObject termParams = currentObj.InvokeMethod("Terminate", (ManagementBaseObject)null, null);

So, in both cases, I get an error when I try to invoke the Terminate method, but the error differs depending on how I arrive at the object (direct path or loop through collection).

I don't think this is related to SeDebugPrivilege, as I believe I'd be getting "access denied" or "insufficient privilege" if it was.

Code if I attempt to directly specify the path to the process:

public int KillServiceWMI(string serviceName, string serverName, string serverUser, string serverDomain, string serverPassword)
{
    try
    {
        ConnectionOptions options = new ConnectionOptions();
        options.Impersonation = System.Management.ImpersonationLevel.Impersonate;
        options.Username = serverDomain + "\\" + serverUser;
        options.Password = serverPassword;

        ManagementScope scope = new ManagementScope("\\\\" + serverName + "\\root\\cimv2", options);
        Console.WriteLine("Connecting to scope");
        scope.Connect();

        Console.WriteLine("Getting ManagementPath");
        ManagementPath servicePath = new ManagementPath("Win32_Service.Name='" + serviceName + "'");
        Console.WriteLine("Getting ManagementObject");
        ManagementObject serviceObj = new ManagementObject(scope, servicePath, new ObjectGetOptions());
        Console.WriteLine("Name of service is " + serviceObj["DisplayName"].ToString());
        Console.WriteLine("Process ID of service is " + serviceObj["ProcessId"].ToString());
        ManagementPath processPath = new ManagementPath("Win32_Process.ProcessId='" + serviceObj["ProcessId"] + "'");
        ManagementObject processObj = new ManagementObject(scope, processPath, new ObjectGetOptions());
        ManagementBaseObject processParams = processObj.InvokeMethod("Terminate", (ManagementBaseObject)null, null);
        int returnCode = System.Convert.ToInt32(processParams.Properties["ReturnValue"].Value);
        return returnCode;
    }
    catch (Exception connectEx)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Connecting to " + serverName + " caused an exception");
        Console.Write(connectEx);
        return 99;
    }
}

Code if I loop through a collection of processes:

public int KillServiceWMI(string serviceName, string serverName, string serverUser, string serverDomain, string serverPassword)
{
    try
    {
        ConnectionOptions options = new ConnectionOptions();
        options.Impersonation = System.Management.ImpersonationLevel.Impersonate;
        options.Username = serverDomain + "\\" + serverUser;
        options.Password = serverPassword;

        ManagementScope scope = new ManagementScope("\\\\" + serverName + "\\root\\cimv2", options);
        Console.WriteLine("Connecting to scope");
        scope.Connect();

        Console.WriteLine("Getting ManagementPath");
        ManagementPath servicePath = new ManagementPath("Win32_Service.Name='" + serviceName + "'");
        Console.WriteLine("Getting ManagementObject");
        ManagementObject serviceObj = new ManagementObject(scope, servicePath, new ObjectGetOptions());
        Console.WriteLine("Name of service is " + serviceObj["DisplayName"].ToString());
        Console.WriteLine("Process ID of service is " + serviceObj["ProcessId"].ToString());
        ObjectQuery serviceQuery = new ObjectQuery("SELECT * from Win32_Process WHERE ProcessID = '" + serviceObj["ProcessId"].ToString() + "'");
        ManagementObjectSearcher serviceSearcher = new ManagementObjectSearcher(scope, serviceQuery);
        ManagementObjectCollection serviceColl = serviceSearcher.Get();
        int returnCode = 0;
        foreach (ManagementObject currentObj in serviceColl)
        {
            if (currentObj["ProcessId"].ToString().Equals(serviceObj["ProcessId"].ToString(), StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase))
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Found process " + currentObj["ProcessId"].ToString() + ". Terminating...");

                ManagementBaseObject termParams = currentObj.InvokeMethod("Terminate", (ManagementBaseObject)null, null);
                returnCode = System.Convert.ToInt32(termParams.Properties["ReturnValue"].Value);
            }
        }
        return returnCode;
    }
    catch (Exception connectEx)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Connecting to " + vaultName + " caused an exception");
        Console.Write(connectEx);
        return 99;
    }
}
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At the risk of asking a silly question - does it have to be WMI/C# ? You know this can be done with PSEXEC from sysinternals? –  Leptonator Sep 24 '13 at 22:52
    
Yeah, I know I could use psexec and get to it that way. In this case, this is a method for a web application that's used to control a bunch of servers. Some of them are, to be delicate, "pokey", and so their services don't stop when commanded to do so with WMI. So Operations is asking me to add a "kill" function to the application so that, after trying (and failing) to stop a service cleanly twice, it tries to terminate the process. –  Formica Sep 24 '13 at 23:26
    
@paqogomez, I have a feeling that you've read this Meta question, and that's what's motivating your recent suggested edits. Please do read the portion of the highest-rated answer that starts with "The only time you should use tags in your title is when they are organic to the conversational tone of the title" (emphasis mine). –  Michael Petrotta Sep 25 '13 at 1:05
    
@MichaelPetrotta Perhaps I've been going a little crazy with that particular rule, but I have thought I have been keeping the highest-rated answer in mind. –  paqogomez Sep 25 '13 at 1:24
    
@paqogomez: also, the second answer gets more into it. I understand the temptation, though. –  Michael Petrotta Sep 25 '13 at 1:26

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I eventually gave up trying to use the Terminate method on Win32_Process, and instead I'm using Create to call TaskKill.exe remotely. Because the return info is now hidden behind taskkill.exe, I then have to get the process list again and look for the target pid to make sure that the process was actually terminated.

ConnectionOptions options = new ConnectionOptions();
options.Impersonation = System.Management.ImpersonationLevel.Impersonate;
options.Username = serverDomain + "\\" + serverUser;
options.Password = serverPassword;

ManagementScope scope = new ManagementScope("\\\\" + serverName + "\\root\\cimv2", options);
Console.WriteLine("Connecting to scope");
scope.Connect();

Console.WriteLine("Getting ManagementPath");
ManagementPath servicePath = new ManagementPath("Win32_Service.Name='" + serviceName + "'");
Console.WriteLine("Getting ManagementObject");
ManagementObject serviceObj = new ManagementObject(scope, servicePath, new ObjectGetOptions());
Console.WriteLine("Name of service is " + serviceObj["DisplayName"].ToString());
Console.WriteLine("Process ID of service is " + serviceObj["ProcessId"].ToString());

// use processid to kill process with taskkill
ObjectGetOptions processObjGetOpt = new ObjectGetOptions();
ManagementPath processPath = new ManagementPath("Win32_Process");
ManagementClass processClass = new ManagementClass(scope, processPath, processObjGetOpt);
ManagementBaseObject processInParams = processClass.GetMethodParameters("Create");
processInParams["CommandLine"] = string.Format("cmd /c \"taskkill /f /pid {0}\"", serviceObj["ProcessId"].ToString());
ManagementBaseObject outParams = processClass.InvokeMethod("Create", processInParams, null);
Console.WriteLine("Return code for taskkill: " + outParams["returnValue"]);
int returnCode = System.Convert.ToInt32(outParams["returnValue"]);
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