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So I'm not super experienced with recursive functions but ideally this function will search an object of arbitrary depth for a specific child and return it but for some reason when I return r; i get r = undefined.

http://jsfiddle.net/RRyRQ/

function search(_for, _in) {
    var r;
    for (var p in _in) {

        // is a match
        if (p == _for) {
            console.log("MATCH");
            r = _in[_for];
            break;
        }

        // if not a match but has children
        if (p != _for && nodeCount(_in[p]) > 0 && r == false) {
            console.log("RECURSE INTO " + p);
            r = search(_for, _in[p]);
        }

    }
    return r;
}

Thanks.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There is no reason to count the number of nodes, as long as it is an object, you can assume a loop is necessary - save yourself the cycles.

Here is a simplified version:

function search(_for, _in) {
    var r;
    for (var p in _in) {
        if ( p === _for ) {
            return _in[p];
        }
        if ( typeof _in[p] === 'object' ) {
            if ( (r = search(_for, _in[p])) !== null ) {
                return r;
            }
        }
    }
    return null;
}

There will be a problem if the value of the object that is found is null, likewise if you were to use false or 0 or -1 similarly. Perhaps it is best to just build and return the path to the object; this way you're only dealing with an array of strings which will allow for a safer comparison.

Updated working fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/RRyRQ/3/

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It makes so much sense! –  Shawn Whinnery Sep 25 '13 at 1:02

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