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So, this is a weekly project for school, and I have got it completely working, but feel as if the way I did it, probably isn't one of of the best ways to do it ( or even a good way ). I was hoping you guys could help optimize it / give a better solution. I have already submitted this version, but would like to know a more optimal solution to the problem.


So to start, here's the problem...

It's almost Halloween and Linus is setting out to the garden to wait for the Great Pumpkin. Unfortunately, due to diversification, there are lots of other gourds in the garden this year, so he needs you to write a program to tell him how many patches of pumpkins there are and how big they are.

The input to this program will be a number of different gardens. The first line of the input for each garden will be the dimensions of the garden, r, the number of rows in the garden, and c, the number of columns, where 0 ≤ r ≤ 40 and 0 ≤ c ≤ 40. Following the dimensions will be r lines with c characters on each line. Each of these characters will be a lower case letter representing the type of gourd grown in the square. A lower case 'p' will represent pumpkins. A garden with 0 for the number of rows and/or columns indicates the end of input and should not be processed.

Example input:

10 10
pzzzzzzzzp
pyypzzzzzy
ppppssssyy
ssspssssyy
ssssppssyy
ssssppsspy
zzzzzzsspy
zzzzzzsspy
yyyypzsspy
yyyypppppy
3 4
pppp
pppp
pppp
1 7
zzzzzzz
0 0

For each garden, output the number of the garden (with the first input set being garden 1), the number of pumpkin patches in the garden, and the size of the pumpkin patches in order from smallest to largest. If there is more than one patch of a given size, print the size as many times as it occurs. Use the following format:

Example Output:

Garden # 1: 4 patches, sizes: 1 4 8 10 
Garden # 2: 1 patches, sizes: 12
Garden # 3: 0 patches, sizes: 

Note: Even though the problem says to input from a file, our professor told us to input through the keyboard.


My approach to this was to put the garden into a 2d array with a border of x's around it. I would then use a function to find a pumpkin patch ( and return its coordinates ). I would then use another function that recursively found if a pumpkin was attached to that one through above, below, left, and right, and returned the size of the pumpkin patch. This function also 'deletes' each pumpkin when it finds it by replacing it by an 'x'. This allowed me to not have to worry about finding pumpkins multiple times.

So here's my code, pretty well commented so that you guys could hopefully understand what I was trying to do.

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream> 

using namespace std; 

const int MAX_ROW = 41; 
const int MAX_COL = 41; 

char input (); 

int checkForPatchSize ( char arr[][MAX_COL], int numOne, int numTwo ); 

bool findPatch ( char arr[][MAX_COL], int &row, int&col ); 

void sort ( int arr[], int size);

int main () 
    {
    int inputNumOne = -1;  // Defaulted to -1, First number for Patch Size
    int inputNumTwo = -1;  // Defaulted to -1, Second number for Patch Size
    int i, j;      // i, j are indexes for loops, number
    int numArr[MAX_ROW][MAX_COL]; // Array for storing Data
    int indexGarden = 0;  
    int index = 1; 

    while ( inputNumOne != 0 ) 
        {
        cin >> inputNumOne;       // User inputs Dimension
        cin >> inputNumTwo;       // Of Garden...
        if ( inputNumOne != 0 and inputNumTwo != 0 )   // End case is that both are 0. 
            { 
            char pumpkinPatch[MAX_ROW][MAX_COL];   // Array for storing pumpkin patch info. 
            for ( i = 0; i < inputNumOne+2; i++ )   
                {
                for ( j = 0; j < inputNumTwo+2; j++ ) 
                     {
                    // This if statement surrounds the garden in X's so that I have a border (allows me to not have to worry about test cases. 
                    if ( i == 0 or j == 0 or i == inputNumOne + 1 or j == inputNumTwo + 1 ) 
                        {
                        pumpkinPatch[i][j] = 'x'; 
                        }
                    else   // This is the input of the garden into a 2d array.
                        {
                        pumpkinPatch[i][j] = input(); 
                        }
                    }

                }




            int row, col, size, numberOfPatches = 0; 
            bool foundPatch = true; 
            index = 1; 

            while ( foundPatch == true )
                {
                row = inputNumOne+2;  // Because I added a border to the garden
                col = inputNumTwo+2;  // the size is +2 of what the user input. 
                foundPatch = findPatch ( pumpkinPatch, row, col );  // Finds the start of a pumpkin patch, and returns the coordinates ( as row and col ). 
                if ( foundPatch == true ) // If a patch is found....
                    {
                    numberOfPatches++;  // Increase number of patches 
                    size = checkForPatchSize ( pumpkinPatch, row, col); // find size of particular patch
                    numArr[indexGarden][index] = size; // put size into data arr (to be printed to screen later). 
                    index++;  


                    }

                }
                numArr[indexGarden][0] = numberOfPatches; // Put number of patches as first item in each column of data arr. 
                indexGarden++; 


            }

        }

    for ( index = 0; index < indexGarden; index++ ) // Print out Garden Info
        {
        cout << "Garden # " << index + 1 <<": " << numArr[index][0] << " patches, sizes: "; 
        int temp = numArr[index][0]; // temp is the number of patches in particular garden. 
        int tempArr[temp];   // temp array to be used for sorting
        int indexTwo; 
        for ( indexTwo = 0; indexTwo < temp; indexTwo++ ) 
            {
            tempArr[indexTwo] = numArr[index][indexTwo+1];   // Transfer sizes into a temp array so that they can be sorted.    

            }
        sort (tempArr, temp);  // Sort ( Sorts arr from smalles to larges ) 

        for ( indexTwo = 0; indexTwo < temp; indexTwo++ )  // Output sorted array to screen.  
            {
            cout << tempArr[indexTwo] << " "; 
            }

        cout << endl; 
       }






    }

char input()
   {
    char letter; 
    cin >> letter; 
    return letter; 
    } 
/////////////// findPatch /////////////////////////////////////////////////
// Requirements: a 2D array of garden, and the size of it (row and col). //
// Returns a bool, true if patch is found, false if no patches found.    //
// row and col are returned by reference to be the coordinates of one    //
//  of the pumpkins in the patch.                                    //
/////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// 
bool findPatch ( char arr[][MAX_COL], int &row, int&col ) 
    {
    int rowIndex = 0; 
int colIndex = 0; 

while ( arr[rowIndex][colIndex] != 'p' and rowIndex < row ) 
    {
    colIndex = 0; 
    while ( arr[rowIndex][colIndex] != 'p' and colIndex < col ) 
        {
        colIndex++;
        }
    if ( arr[rowIndex][colIndex] != 'p' )       
        {
        rowIndex++;
        }
    }

if ( arr[rowIndex][colIndex] != 'p' ) 
    {
    return false; 
    }
row = rowIndex;
col = colIndex; 
return true; 

}

/////////////// checkForPatchSize /////////////////////////////////////////
// Requirements: a 2D array of garden, and the coordinates of the start  //
//                 of a patch.  (Gotten from findPatch)                  //
// Returns an int, which is the size of the patch found                  //
// All p's or pumpkins are changed to x's so that they are not used      // 
//  multiple times.                                                  //
/////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// 
int checkForPatchSize ( char arr[][MAX_COL], int numOne, int numTwo ) 
{
int index = 0;  


if ( arr[numOne][numTwo] == 'p' ) 
    {
    index++; 
    arr[numOne][numTwo] = '0';

        // Check Above
        index += checkForPatchSize ( arr, numOne - 1, numTwo );

        // Check to Left
        index += checkForPatchSize ( arr, numOne, numTwo - 1 ); 

        // Check Below
        index += checkForPatchSize ( arr, numOne + 1, numTwo ); 

        // Check to Right 
        index += checkForPatchSize ( arr, numOne, numTwo + 1 ); 

    return index; 
    }

return 0;





}
/////////////// sort //////////////////////////////////////////////////////
// Requirements: an integer array, and the size of it (amount of         //
//               numbers in it).                                         //
//                                                                       //
// Sorts an array from smalles to largest numbers                        //
/////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// 
void sort ( int arr[], int size ) 
{
int index = 0; 
bool changeMade = true; 

while ( changeMade == true ) 
    {
    changeMade = false;
    for ( index = 0; index < size - 1; index++ ) 
        {
        if ( arr[index] > arr[index+1] ) 
            {
            int temp = arr[index]; 
            arr[index] = arr[index+1];
            arr[index+1] = temp;
            changeMade = true; 
            } 
        }

    }
}
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1  
I this might be a good question for: Code Review –  dcaswell Sep 25 '13 at 2:22
1  
Note: the VLA on line 93 (or there abouts), int tempArr[temp]; is a C99 feature supported optionally by said-implementations (C99). It is not part of the C++ standard, and you should use a std::vector<int> tempArr(tmp); in its place. –  WhozCraig Sep 25 '13 at 2:39

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Alright, after reading through your code, I see your approach. Generally, I would approach this from a visual perspective. As it is, your code should work just fine, and is quite an elegant solution. The single weakness of your algorithm is the fact that it iterates over the same patch each time it moves. For example, when it moves upwards, it checks downwards. Avoiding redundancy is the surest sign of an optimal algorithm, but in terms of the small-scale at which you are deploying the algorithm, it need not be optimal.

In a way, the recursive nature of your code makes it quite beautiful because it traverses the pumpkin patch like little sparks that die out, which I really do like. Recursion is something which I don't often bother myself with, mostly because I don't think recursively, but after spending a moment wrapping my head around your algorithm, I really do see its value in cases like this. I would love to see the algorithm at work with dynamic visuals.

As for the accuracy of your algorithm, I can not imagine that it would fail in any manner to count the pumpkins correctly because it functions by making a small wave around the picked pumpkin in which the algorithm repeats itself, effectively propagating through the patch until it is all counted. As I said, the only shortcoming of your algorithm is that it would fall into an infinite loop if you did not somehow mark pumpkins as found (it checks the position it was called from). Beyond that, I can only say that you've proposed an excellent solution and that your doubts are almost entirely misplaced. Using a recursive algorithm was an excellent choice in this regard because it doesn't require a long list of cases in order to 'count'; it simply jumps into adjacent positions, returning to itself with the full count.

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