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I have a fairly simple variant class which supports a predefined set of types, and provides an enumerate to indicate which of the available types is currently active. Something like this:

class variant
{ 
  enum class type { integer, real, string, etc };
  type active_type() const;
  /* ... */ 
};

I would like to make the class into a template where the supported types are supplied as template parameters:

template <typename... T>
class variant
{ 
  const std::type_info& active_type() const; // logical, but can't switch on it
  /* ... */ 
};

A key feature that I rely on for catching errors is that I can switch on the active type and the compiler will warn if any of the possible cases have been missed. This is not possible using the above design (nor using boost::variant).

My question is, is there any way for me to automatically generate an enum with the same number of enumerates as the number of arguments in the parameter pack?

The actual names/values of the enumerates would not matter, as they can be hidden behind constexpr functions used to map the type to the correct enumerate. I could imagine an eventual usage like this:

template <typename... T>
class variant
{
  enum class type { T... }; // magic here

  // specializations provided to map T into type (for use in case labels)
  template <typename T>
  static constexpr type type_enum();

  type active_type() const;
  /* ... */
};

typedef variant<int, float, std::string> myvar;
myvar var;
switch (var.active_type())
{
case myvar::type_enum<int>(): // static constexpr function
  ...
  break;
case myvar::type_enum<float>():
  ...
  break;
} // warning: enumeration for string not handled in switch
share|improve this question
1  
Having to switch depending on a variables type is almost never a good design. Inheritance and virtual functions are often a suitable replacement. –  Joachim Pileborg Sep 25 '13 at 4:49
3  
It seems this is an example of the XY problem, you have a solution that doesn't work, and want help with it. But there may be more than one solution to your actual problem that you try to solve. Describing what you want to accomplish (together with what you have tried) often yields better answers. –  Joachim Pileborg Sep 25 '13 at 4:56
    
The source of boost.org/doc/libs/1_51_0/boost/spirit/home/support/detail/… might give you some ideas. –  Troy Sep 25 '13 at 5:03
    
@JoachimPileborg Sure, almost never. But on those occasions where it is necessary, it's nice to have a generalized variant template to ease the pain. I'm not trying to solve a problem with a variant, I'm trying to write a robust class that minimizes the pain for when a variant is the right solution. –  marack Sep 25 '13 at 5:18
    
@Troy Thanks for that Troy. Unfortunately boost::any suffers from the same problem as my second version from the question. It only gives you a std::type_info, which means going to a cascade of if/else comparisons instead of a switch - so missed cases still can't be diagnosed by the compiler. –  marack Sep 25 '13 at 5:21

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