Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am maintaining some code which has a class containing a method that calls a WCF method asynchronously using the Task pattern.

The code effectively looks like this:

public class Manager : IDisposable
{
    public void DoSomething()
    {
        Task<bool> task;

        using (var client = new WcfClient())
        {
            task = client.ReallyDoSomethingAsync(123);
        }
    }
}

The manager itself is used somewhere else in another piece of code that wraps the call to DoSomething inside a using(Manager) block.

So my question is, what happens to the WCF call. Does it happen? Does it abandon?

And more generally, does this hold true for asynchronous calls using the Task<T> pattern? What happens if the owning class goes out of scope before the asynchronous call finishes?

share|improve this question
1  
using calls the dispose method of enclosing object. In that case client is probably disposed and calling task might cause exception. –  Muctadir Sep 25 '13 at 9:33
    
@MuctadirDinar yes I agree that referencing the task object might indeed fail, but what happens to ReallyDoSomethingAsync? Does the call to the WCF service happen and go through to completion, regardless of the dead client? –  SimonGoldstone Sep 25 '13 at 9:36
    
If an object is dead how can you call one of its methods? –  Muctadir Sep 25 '13 at 9:39
    
It's not dead at the point of calling it. Client.ReallyDoSomethingAsync(123) is a perfectly valid call at that stage. It returns a Task<bool>. AFTER that, it goes out of scope. So what happens to the Asynchronous call? –  SimonGoldstone Sep 25 '13 at 9:40
    
When WcfClient is disposed of (with using), I'd expect it to automatically cancel any async tasks it has created, including the one returned from ReallyDoSomethingAsync. So, outside the scope the task should be in cancelled state. I haven't verified that, though. –  Noseratio Sep 25 '13 at 11:26

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

After knocking-up a brief test app, it seems that when a WCF client is disposed, it waits for all async tasks to complete before it actually disposes.

Example WCF service:

 public class Service1 : IService1
 {
    public string GetData(int value)
    {
        Thread.Sleep(5000);

        return "GOT HERE " + value;
    }
 }

Example client:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        using (var wrapper = new Wrapper())
        {
            wrapper.DoSomething();
        }

        Console.WriteLine("Finished.");
        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}

class Wrapper : IDisposable
{
    public void DoSomething()
    {
        Task<string> task1;

        using (var client = new ServiceReference1.Service1Client())
        {
            task1 = client.GetDataAsync(1);
            var task2 = client.GetDataAsync(2);

            Thread.Sleep(1000);

            var task3 = client.GetDataAsync(3);

            Console.WriteLine("Calls started");
        }

        Console.WriteLine("Result of task 1:" + task1.Result);
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
    }
}

In this scenario, the "Calls started" line appears after the 1 second delay. The "Finished." line does not get written until all the three tasks have completed successfully.

So it does in fact appear that the WCF Service Client wrapper manages its tasks and waits for completion (or presumably timeout) before disposing.

... Which gets me thinking: If you want to call a long running WCF method in a "fire and forget" asynchronous manner, you would either have to do it without a using block or wrap the whole thing in its own task. So that's a lot of wrapping!

share|improve this answer
1  
Fascinating. Tomorrow I will delve deeper into this. Nice work! –  Simon Whitehead Sep 25 '13 at 12:01
    
Hmm, it should not really be waiting for task completion. @Simon, could you try it without Thread.Sleep(1000) and Console.WriteLine inside using and with changing task1.Result to task1.Status and let us know the value of task1.Status? –  Noseratio Sep 25 '13 at 12:01
1  
Done that. In DoSomething() if I now just start all 3 tasks, write their status and exit, it shows WaitingForActivation for all 3. And then waits for 5-6 seconds before leaving the using block. –  SimonGoldstone Sep 25 '13 at 13:38
1  
What matters, the Status shows the tasks don't get cancelled. So now we know: apparently, the client proxy for a WCF service, when being disposed of, doesn't cancel its pending tasks. Interesting. This is in contrary to how I'd expect it to work. A good question, +1. –  Noseratio Sep 25 '13 at 13:46
1  
BTW, just for the purpose of being complete, a breakpoint in the WCF service code shows that the code runs to completion on all three calls. And this happens BEFORE the dispose on the wrapper. So, in the absence of any other answer, I'm going to mark this one as correct. –  SimonGoldstone Sep 25 '13 at 14:02

Basically, each Task has two sides: the producer (which can be something like TaskCompletionSource) and the consumer (the Task itself).

Even when there are no references to the consumer side, there still is a reference to the producer side. What this means is that abandoning the Task won't do anything: the async call will continue as normal. And only after it completes, the Task will become eligible for garbage collection.

If you do want to cancel the asynchronous operation, you need to explicitly tell the producer to stop, which is usually done by passing it a CancellationToken.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks and Agreed. However, the behaviour I wasn't expecting to see what that the WCF Service Client appears to be waiting for asynchronous calls to complete/time out before disposing. –  SimonGoldstone Sep 25 '13 at 13:36

Not really an answer for WCF specifically (that is, this doesn't address the question of "Does the service actually fire off the method call prior to leaving the using block).. but this:

Task<int> task;

using (var sr = new StreamReader(File.OpenRead(@"C:\really_big_file.txt"))) {
    task = sr.ReadAsync(new char[2000000], 0, 2000000);
}

Console.WriteLine(task.Result);

Will fail with Cannot access a closed file. So, it would appear that there is no funny business going on here.. and everything runs as you would expect. Dispose is called, and attempting to access the resource tied to the task results in failure.

As for checking a WCF service call specifically.. I guess it's just another simple debug setup like this to test it.

In answer to your question about whether a task completes once it goes out of scope.. the answer is yes.

Tasks spawn threads. If you spawn a thread, you don't have to keep a reference to it. The ThreadPool will schedule it and it will run to completion.

See the Thread documentation for a rundown on that.

Specifically, it says:

It is not necessary to retain a reference to a Thread object once you have started the thread. The thread continues to execute until the thread procedure is complete.

share|improve this answer
1  
Updated my answer to address that. –  Simon Whitehead Sep 25 '13 at 9:50
1  
No worries. It's hard to say for sure that the WCF service would definitely call the method before going out of scope. When you take into consideration the threadpool firing up.. possibly building up a new thread, etc.. it's possible that Dispose is called before it can fire off the method call in a new thread. –  Simon Whitehead Sep 25 '13 at 9:55
1  
The obvious workaround is to spawn your own task that wraps the entire construct.. using and all.. –  Simon Whitehead Sep 25 '13 at 10:00
1  
“Tasks wrap threads.” That's really not true when it comes to async method. –  svick Sep 25 '13 at 12:34
1  
@SimonWhitehead Maybe something like what I said in my answer? That there is always some “producer”, be it thread or async operation and that abandoning the Task does nothing to the producer. –  svick Sep 25 '13 at 12:40

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.