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What is the regex pattern for these rules:

  • Uppercase in the first digit of the name

Valid: John Invalid: JohN

  • Uppercase in the middle of the name is allowed but only once.

Valid: McArthur Invalid: McArThuR

  • Using apostrophe (') once only and must in the middle of the name

Valid: Mac O'Brian Invalid: Mac' O''Brian

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closed as off-topic by larsmans, deceze, Floris, Jerry, M42 Sep 25 '13 at 13:36

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions asking for code must demonstrate a minimal understanding of the problem being solved. Include attempted solutions, why they didn't work, and the expected results. See also: Stack Overflow question checklist" – deceze, Floris, Jerry, M42
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

6  
Good luck with this... –  leppie Sep 25 '13 at 12:52
4  
What have you tried? Per the flagging menu: "Questions asking for code *must demonstrate a minimal understanding of the problem being solved*. Include attempted solutions, why they didn't work, and the expected results. See also: Stack Overflow question checklist." –  War10ck Sep 25 '13 at 12:53
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How about names like "Jan de Wit", "Paul-Henri Carle de Limoges", etc. How many spaces are OK. Do all "words" need to start with a capital in your world? Can more than one word have an apostrophe? How about hyphens? –  Floris Sep 25 '13 at 12:54
9  
Falshoods programmers believe about names is an interesting read, even if you're going to decide that it doesn't apply to your situation. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Sep 25 '13 at 12:55
8  
Telling somebody that their name isn't valid is generally a bad user experience. –  David Sep 25 '13 at 13:03

3 Answers 3

This is a global regex that will work for all names around the world in any culture.

^.+$

You are welcome.

What you are trying to do is impose complex validation upon a very open field. Consider providing given name and family name input fields instead.

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2  
It does exclude the nameless... :) –  deceze Sep 25 '13 at 13:00
3  
I suppose you mean given name because in large parts (most?) of the world, the family name is the first name. –  larsmans Sep 25 '13 at 13:02
    
@larsmans agreed. I was aware of the problem while typing it but could not think of the correct word. –  Gusdor Sep 25 '13 at 13:05
    
@deceze Put that down to my laziness in not looking up if i should use * or + :D –  Gusdor Sep 25 '13 at 13:06

If you're really intending this for validation (e.g. in a web form or account sign-up) I'd pay attention to Damien_The_Unbeliever's comment. It's probably better to let people spell their names however they like; there are better ways to identify trolls after the fact.

But, as an intellectual exercise, here's a regex that validates per the examples you gave. This is PCRE syntax; you may need to adapt or amend it for your specific regex syntax or flavor:

[A-Z][a-z]+(?:[A-Z]?'?|'?[A-Z])[a-z]+

Note that you'd have to apply this to each name or name part individually, but since your validation pattern is mostly driven by Western European surname conventions, it probably makes sense to apply to the last name only.

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This assumes that middle apostrophe is next to middle uppercase letter. The original question didn't have this assumption. –  Hubert OG Sep 25 '13 at 13:04
    
True; I took is as implied (apostrophe separates name-parts in Irish/Scottish style names). But better not to make assumptions when it comes to a spec. –  Dan Bron Sep 25 '13 at 13:10
[A-Z][a-z ]*   (?:   [A-Z]?[a-z ]*\'?   |   \'?[a-z ]*[A-Z]?   )   [a-z ]+

Discard the whitespace outside square brackets, I've put them just to make the different parts clear.

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