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I would like to know how can I copy this following container to a temporary variable and how should that temp variable be defined as well.

const char *containers_1[] = {"one","two","why do I stuck in this problem"};
const char *containers_2[] = {"Other","string","here"};

So I am looking for a temp variable of a suitable type which I can copy one of those containers to. The declaration of "const char * container []" is from a piece of code that I don't wanna change to keep the format nicely!

Thanks for your time.

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Do you want to copy containers or elements inside the container? If you want to "copy" one of the containers, use a pointer. – Mert Sep 25 '13 at 14:39
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The code should be improved however I think this is what you want.

const char *containers_1[] = {"one","two","why do I stuck in this problem"};
const char *containers_2[] = {"Other","string","here","whis","has","more"};

main(int argc, char **argv) {

char ** tmp1;
int i, size;

size = sizeof(containers_1);
printf ("%d\n", size);
tmp1 = malloc(size);
memcpy(tmp1, containers_1, sizeof(containers_1));

for (i=0; i< size/sizeof(char *); i++) {
    printf("%s\n", tmp1[i]);
    }

size = sizeof(containers_2);
printf ("%d\n", size);
tmp1 = malloc(size);
memcpy(tmp1, containers_2, sizeof(containers_2));

for (i=0; i< size/sizeof(char *); i++) {
    printf("%s\n", tmp1[i]);
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is exactly what I wanted. Thanks you. And I should deallocate after, right? How about if the scope of allocation and deallocation is different? – Hamed Sep 25 '13 at 15:19
    
Yes you are correct you should deallocate memory after use. There's no scope issue, tmp1 can be global as long as your local functions can work out whether tmp1 has been set (initialise to zero, and check before allocating whether you need to deallocate). If you are allocating/deallocating frequently then you could consider allocating the max_size of containers_* once and just memsetting the memory to zero, but then your exit condition in for loops should be changed to check for a zero pointer. – X Tian Sep 26 '13 at 8:26

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