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I have huge if elif else statements that work fine... they just seem extremely unpythony and I am about to double the number I need. Basically I am taking a user input for a the number of x-values for a graph, sending it through a data sorter, and graphing it. For simplicity sake I am only putting the x=1 (min) and x=6 (max) values, but I want to add a 'How many y's?' but I fear that will be way too bulky and confusing.

Any way I can condense this?

Code:

howManyX = int(raw_input('Input number of x-values for this graph: '))

if howManyX == 1:
    x1 = int(raw_input("Input column number for x1-value: "))
    x2 = 1
    x3 = 1
    x4 = 1
    x5 = 1
    x6 = 1
elif howManyX == 6:
    x1 = int(raw_input("Input column number for x1-value: "))
    x2 = int(raw_input("Input column number for x2-value: "))
    x3 = int(raw_input("Input column number for x3-value: "))
    x4 = int(raw_input("Input column number for x4-value: "))
    x5 = int(raw_input("Input column number for x5-value: "))
    x6 = int(raw_input("Input column number for x6-value: "))

this part below is the same except x1 is x(n) through 6. The code is all correct, I just need to change x1 into x(1-6)

if x1 == 0:
    x1a = sheet.col_values(x1)
    x1b = [i for i in x1a if i != '']
    x1c = [i for i in x1b if type(i) == float][1:]
    x1Axis = [datetime.strptime(str(int(d)), '%Y%m%d') for d in x1c]
elif x1 == 31:
    x1a = sheet.col_values(x1)
    clear()
    print "\n\n\n1: Top"
    print "2. Bottom"
    is_valid = 0
    while not is_valid :
        try :
            choice = int ( raw_input('Enter your choice [1 or 2] : ') )
            is_valid = 1 ## set it to 1 to validate input and to terminate the while..not loop
        except ValueError, e :
            print ("'%s' is not a valid integer." % e.args[0].split(": ")[1])
    if choice == 1:
        x1Axis = filter(None, [i for i, j in zip(x1a, x1a[1:] + ['']) if j != ''])[1:]
    elif choice == 2:
        x1Axis = filter(None, [i for i, j in zip(x1a, x1a[1:] + ['']) if j == ''])[2:]
    else:
        print ("Invalid number. Try again...")
else:
    x1a = sheet.col_values(x1)
    x1Axis = filter(None, [i for i, j in zip(x1a, x1a[1:] + ['']) if j == ''])[2:]

It looks like a lot, and that may just be that my code is messy. I think it just needs a simple for-loop, but I am getting overwhelmed so I don't know where to start. Everything is working well. It just looks messy

share|improve this question
    
So, what should happen if there's two? –  Jon Clements Sep 25 '13 at 15:21

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The input section can be rewritten just by making it keep a list of six column numbers, rather than six separate variables:

howManyX = int(raw_input('Input number of x-values for this graph: '))

x_col_nums = [1] * 6
for i in range(howManyX):
    x_col_nums[i] = int(raw_input("Input column number for x%d-value: " % (i + 1)))

Then simply put the entire second block into this for loop:

for x1 in x_col_nums:
    # all your second block of code goes here
    # you might want to change the variable name x1 to just be x, which might
    # make it clearer

To save variables like x(n)Axis so that you can use them afterwards, keep a list of those variables, by putting the line:

xaxes = []

before the loop, and adding the line

    xaxes.append(x1Axis)

in the loop. Afterwards, you can access what used to be x1Axis, x2Axis... as xaxes[0], xaxes[1] and so on.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok, almost. How would I use each xAxis value independently afterwards? (To create multiple x-axis on graphs) –  TallnGinger Sep 25 '13 at 16:31
    
Because it is simply saving over each x1Axis every time, is there a way to have a variable change as the for loop advances? Say go from x1Axis to x2Axis? –  TallnGinger Sep 25 '13 at 16:35
    
@TallnGinger: See edit. –  David Robinson Sep 25 '13 at 16:39
howManyX = int(raw_input('Input number of x-values for this graph: '))

if howManyX == 1:
    x1 = int(raw_input("Input column number for x1-value: "))
    x2 = x3 = x4 = x5 = = x6 = 1

elif howManyX == 6:
    x1, x2, x3, x4, x5, x6 = (
        int(raw_input("Input column number for x{}-value: ".format(i)))
        for i in range(1, 7)
    )
share|improve this answer
    
Note that this doesn't do what the question asks, since he provides only the 1 and 6 cases in the code: For simplicity sake I am only putting the x=1 (min) and x=6 (max) values –  David Robinson Sep 25 '13 at 15:21
    
Well, I must not understand the question. I'll leave this here on the off-chance it's valid. –  Veedrac Sep 25 '13 at 15:24
    
+1 for list comprehension (pythonic way) –  Jiri Sep 25 '13 at 15:24

You can probably just convert every xN variable to an equivalent in some array. For example xs... although you should really name it after what it is rather just x in this case.

The first part will be something like:

howManyX = int(raw_input('Input number of x-values for this graph: '))
xs = [1]*howManyX
for i in range(howManyX):
    xs[i] = int(raw_input("Input column number for x%i-value: " % (i+1)))

Of course the other block will also need updating the variables. If you use the variables between different xs, you can do xAxes[i], or if they're only local to single x, remove the number completely.

share|improve this answer

You could just have the user enter values that they're interested in (let's say in the form of a dict) and evaluate that. That way they can specify columns 7 and 12 and not worry about others... You can use max(vals) to get the highest column referred to if you wish... (or however your key->value pair relationship is defined)

from ast import literal_eval

# User enters something like: { 1:3, 5: 2}
vals = literal_eval(raw_input()) 
if not isinstance(vals, dict):
    # Uh oh... maybe do something here?
# Then use (to get columns, or 1 or whatever if not entered)
col_val3 = vals.get(3, 1)
share|improve this answer

You use too many variables instead of arrays. You can use for loop and array x:

x = [None]*howManyX
for i in range(howManyX):
    x[i] = int(raw_input("Input column number for x%d-value: " % (i+1)))

In specific cases you can set back class variables (using built-in setattr) or in case of simple script you can even set global variables (if you really need that):

scope = globals()   # in case of simple script
scope = self.__dict__
for i, val in enumerate(x):
   scope["x%d" % (i+1)] = val
share|improve this answer
2  
Please don't set on locals. Most of the time it doesn't even work. –  Veedrac Sep 25 '13 at 15:23
    
ok, that is correct. I will change that to globals(), it can be changed imo. –  Jiri Sep 25 '13 at 15:29
    
No, please don't do that either. :/ –  Veedrac Sep 25 '13 at 15:32
    
@Veedrac I though that globals() (beside the locals) dictionary can be modified. It is still supported in CPython 2/3, in PyPy ... But I understand that global variables should be avoided in this case and in general too. –  Jiri Sep 25 '13 at 15:47
    
It'll work. It's just a bad idea. –  Veedrac Sep 25 '13 at 16:10

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