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I have a templated function for .find for vectors in a sorted_vector header file that I received for an assignment. I am doing unit testing on the different methods/constructors etc using the BOOST library in order to make sure there are no bugs and to make the code more foolproof in case bugs are introduced. I just had a quick question about the differences between these two code blocks:

template <typename T>
typename sorted_vector<T>::iterator sorted_vector<T>::find( value_type const& value ) const {
    auto front = beg_;
    auto back = end_;

        for( ;; ) {
            auto p = (back - front)/2 + front;
            if( p == end_ )
                return p;
            else if( *p == value )
                return p;
            else if( *p > value )
                back = p;
            else
                front = p + 1;
        }
}

And this block:

template <typename T>
typename sorted_vector<T>::iterator sorted_vector<T>::find( value_type const& value ) const {
    auto front = beg_;
    auto back = end_;

    for( ;; ) { 
        auto p = (back - front)/2 + front;
        if( p == back )
            return end_;
        else if( *p == value )
            return p;
        else if( *p > value )
            back = p;
        else
            front = p + 1;
     }
}

My question is regarding the first if statement in the infinite for. In the first code block is it returning the middle value every time it iterates through the vector if it cannot find the value instead of the end? Or what is the main difference between the two if statements?

Thanks.

EDIT for the beg_ and end_ they are instantiated this way:

private beg_;
private end_;

and here are how they are used normally:

sorted_vector() : beg_(nullptr), end_(nullptr), cap_(nullptr) { }
iterator begin() { return iterator( beg_ ); }
iterator end() { return iterator( end_ ); }
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1  
The second one is a little better formatted. –  Hot Licks Sep 25 '13 at 15:51
    
You cannot have a type named private. –  Neil Kirk Sep 25 '13 at 16:41

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Well, it appears that beg_ and end_ are member variables of the class that designate the beginning and the end of the stored sequence [beg_, end_). Since these values never change, the first version of the code is simply incorrect: during the binary search the value of p will have no chance to become equal to end_ (aside from a narrow set of specific cases, like when the key is greater than any of the stored values). I would expect the first version to gets stuck in an infinite cycle if the key is not present in the array and is not greater than the last value in the array.

Meanwhile, the second version is implemented correctly (assuming it has no other bugs): it checks p against the end of the current sub-segment [front, back) of the original sequence, not against the end of the original sequence.

In any case, it is not really possible to fully analyze this code without knowing what conventions are followed there. What is end_, for example? Is is an iterator for the last element of the array? Or is it iterator for the one-past-the-last element of the array?

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Yes, beg_ and end_ are both private variables. So say I have a vector of 1001 ints from 1-1000 and I search for a value. What value would cause it to not equal to end_? beg_, end_, or the middle? Or will any arbitrary value possibly cause an issue? –  Aaron G. Sep 25 '13 at 15:42
1  
Right, the first one is just buggy. Consider an array with one element, that element equal to 0, searching for a value of 1. That will make back equal front and loop forever. Or try searching for a value of -1; that will increment front and dereference past the end of the array. (This code actually works if and only if the value is in the array and the array is sorted.) –  Nemo Sep 25 '13 at 15:42
1  
@Aaron G.: Any value that is not present in the array and at the same time not greater than the max value in the array should either cause infinite cycle or, maybe, undefined behavior. For example, if you search for 5 in an array of { 1, 8, 20 } the first version should fail to work properly. –  AnT Sep 25 '13 at 15:44

There is a difference. You are completely right about what it is doing, but keep in mind the line "back = p;".

What will happen is after a few loops, back will most likely change to a larger value. (because if p is greater than a value, back is set to p)

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I don't see how back can "change to a larger value". p is calculated as a mid-point between front and back. So, when we do back = p, we always move back backwards, to a smaller value. And that is the only place where back can change, –  AnT Sep 25 '13 at 23:27
    
This line shows p getting larger: auto p = (back - front)/2 + front; –  Garrett Sep 26 '13 at 13:03
    
Larger than what exactly? This line will always produce p that is smaller than back. –  AnT Sep 26 '13 at 14:26
    
If back is 6 and front is 12. (6-12)/2 = -3, -3+12 = 9, 9 > 6, p > back –  Garrett Sep 26 '13 at 14:42
1  
Well, yes, you got me :) On a serious note though, the critically important invariant of this algorithm is that front is always less-or-equal than back, i.e. it is not possible for front to be 12 when back is 6. –  AnT Sep 26 '13 at 17:06

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