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I'm trying to create a master view/controller for a Backbone project, and I'm having troubles accessing the views within the view properly. Here's the code:

var Controller = Backbone.View.extend({
    initialize: function() {
        this.characterView = new CharacterView({model: character});
        this.encounterView = new EncounterView({collection: encounter});
        this.characterView.$el.on('click', '.attack', this.charAttack);
    },
    charAttack: function() {
        console.log(this.characterView);
    },
    render: function() {
        this.encounterView.render();
        this.characterView.render();
        console.log(this.characterView.model.toJSON());
    }
});

var controller = new Controller();
controller.render();

The this.characterView in charAttack is undefined whereas in the render function, it uses the right object. I'm not sure why render can access this.characterView, but charAttack can't. Any help to understand this would be greatly appreciated.

share|improve this question
1  
this.characterView.$el.on('click', '.attack', this.charAttack); is a strange thing to be doing in a Backbone app. That would normally be handled through characterView's events map and the actually attacking logic would probably be a method on the character model which would broadcast any state changes (such as death from losing too many HP) through events. – mu is too short Sep 25 '13 at 16:55
    
If I have a characterView and an encounterView (with the monsters), how would I access a model from a collection in encounterView from characterView? i.e. Character clicks attack, prompts charAttack which shows buttons on monsters, click on the button, and charAttack uses that model and it's own model to process the combat logic. Here's the repo if it helps: github.com/mmerkes/into_the_shadow – EmptyArsenal Sep 25 '13 at 17:34
    
Actually, wouldn't the "attack" button be part of the encounter view? And presumably the encounter view would know who was involved in the encounter. – mu is too short Sep 25 '13 at 17:43
    
Perhaps, but I'm trying to keep the action buttons on the characterView (which is aside from the encounterView) so that once I have more actions (use item, cast spell, etc) that come up during your turn, the actions would dictate what views/models/collections are affected. For this reason, I created the controller/master view so that I could access both views within it. – EmptyArsenal Sep 25 '13 at 17:49
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Add _.bindAll to your initialize function:

initialize: function() {
    _.bindAll(this); // assuming Underscore < 1.5.0
    this.characterView = new CharacterView({model: character});
    this.encounterView = new EncounterView({collection: encounter});
    this.characterView.$el.on('click', '.attack', this.charAttack);
},

This ensures that this inside the view functions (including charAttack) always refers to the view.


To verify if you're having this problem try this in Chrome with the console open:

charAttack: function() {
    debugger;
    console.log(this.characterView);
},

Then in the console type this and see if it's bound to window or another variable.

share|improve this answer
    
_.bindAll without method names is deprecated since Underscore 1.5.0 underscorejs.org/#changelog – nikoshr Sep 25 '13 at 16:17
    
Thanks for pointing that out. – Matt Zeunert Sep 25 '13 at 16:36
2  
_.bindAll(this, 'charAttack'); would do the trick for nearly all versions of Underscore, but to each his own. – nikoshr Sep 25 '13 at 16:43
    
_.bindAll(this, 'charAttack'); did the trick. And definitely right on the lack of methods names. – EmptyArsenal Sep 25 '13 at 17:43

You can't access this elements unless you have instanted your Object.

var ModController = function(){
    var characterView;
    var encounterView;

    var Controller = Backbone.View.extend({
        initialize: function() {
            characterView = new CharacterView({model: character});
            encounterView = new EncounterView({collection: encounter});
            this.characterView.$el.on('click', '.attack', this.charAttack);
        },
        charAttack: function() {
            console.log(characterView);
        },
        render: function() {
            encounterView.render();
            characterView.render();
            console.log(this.characterView.model.toJSON());
        } 
    });

    return new Controller();

}

var myController = new ModController(); 
myController.render();

So I beleave that Revealing Pattern could solve you problem.

share|improve this answer
    
Sure global variable is not a good idea, you need to combine for example a Revealing Pattern to restrict the scope of this variables. – Claudio Santos Sep 25 '13 at 17:28
    
Thanks for sharing the revealing pattern. It looks interesting. – EmptyArsenal Sep 25 '13 at 17:50

There's a few points to note:

  1. 1 you are using jQuery to bind DOM events, when in fact backbone provides a more elegant and useful mechanism to achieve the same goal. Take a look at backbone's event hash can be found here.
  2. You are calling controller.charAttack from inside an event handler. When you do this, the property this within controller.charAttack will not point to 'controller', most likely it will point to 'window'.

There are many ways to get around the problem. Because you are responding to a click event, you could instead bind your event handlers using backbone's events property. Remove the line this.characterView.$el… and add this new property (typically before the initialise declaration:

events: {
  'click .attack' : 'charAttack'
}, 
share|improve this answer
    
I tried adding the above code, and the js console logged that charAttack was not defined. – EmptyArsenal Sep 25 '13 at 17:42
    
My mistake, sorry. I forgot to add quotes around 'charAttack'. I see you've selected an answer that would work. Glad to hear you got past your difficulty.For others coming to the question, the events:{} hash as a property of a view is the standard way to set up responses to DOM events. It's a nice, declarative syntax and behind the scenes backbone will set up the event binding for you. – Simon Dell Oct 1 '13 at 10:18

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