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I want to print few words followed by a int followed by few words again followed by a big int in python. How can we do it... Like in c++, we do:

cout<<" "<<x<<" "<y

where x and y are integers.

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closed as off-topic by John Kugelman, Henry Keiter, Mark, glts, phimuemue Sep 25 '13 at 17:46

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Have you tried anything? Have you done any research? –  Henry Keiter Sep 25 '13 at 17:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There are several ways, just to mention a few:

# Python 2.x

print 'before', 42, 'after'
print 'before ' + str(42) + ' after'
print '%s %d %s' % ('before', 42, 'after')  # deprecated
print '{} {} {}'.format('before', 42, 'after')

# Python 3.x

print('before', 42, 'after', sep=' ')
print('before ' + str(42) + ' after')
print('%s %d %s' % ('before', 42, 'after')) # deprecated
print('{} {} {}'.format('before', 42, 'after'))

All of the above statements will produce the same result on-screen:

=> before 42 after
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3  
print "some words", 42, "more words" –  jlujan Sep 25 '13 at 16:40
    
I would use the more general repr instead of str –  SAAD May 19 '14 at 14:47

You can do it this way:

print 'word %s word word' % 42
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@John Kugelman, check my edit –  Michael Vayvala Sep 25 '13 at 16:51

Something closer to C

i = 34
x = 56
print "Integer i = %d and integer x = %d" % (i,x)
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