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I am looping through process on a linux box in perl. I want to display total cpu for a particular process, but I want to show total usage for every instance of the process. In example:

USER       PID %CPU %MEM    VSZ   RSS TTY      STAT START   TIME COMMAND
northriv 10228  0.0  0.2  23692  8084 ?        S    Sep18   0:00 /usr/local/apache2/bin/httpd -k start
northriv 10229  0.0  0.2  23692  8084 ?        S    Sep18   0:00 /usr/local/apache2/bin/httpd -k start
northriv 10186  0.0  0.2  23692  8084 ?        S    Sep18   0:00 /usr/local/apache2/bin/httpd -k start
northriv 10187  0.0  0.2  23692  8084 ?        S    Sep18   0:00 /usr/local/apache2/bin/httpd -k start
speaktra 25535  0.2  1.0  46788 33212 ?        S    Sep23   6:04 /usr/local/apache2/bin/httpd -k start
speaktra 25547  0.2  0.8  40320 26712 ?        S    Sep23   6:21 /usr/local/apache2/bin/httpd -k start
wvneuroc  1570  0.2  0.0   2136  1044 ?        S    12:52   0:00 /usr/bin/qpopper -F -S
speaktra 25546  0.2  0.7  35680 22116 ?        S    Sep23   6:45 /usr/local/apache2/bin/httpd -k start
speaktra 1570  0.2  0.0   2136  1044 ?        S    12:52   0:00 /usr/bin/qpopper -F -S

Something like this would then output by user and processs like this.

northriv
(0.0): /usr/local/apache2/bin/httpd

speacktra
(0.6): /usr/local/apache2/bin/httpd
(0.2): /usr/bin/qpopper -F -S

wvneuroc
(0.2): /usr/bin/qpopper -F -S

I know I need to use some type of hash but not strong there, here is the code I am using so far.

!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;

my @stats;
my $date=`date +"\%m-\%d-\%Y-\%r"`;
chomp $date;

my @process_table = `ps aux --sort=\%cpu|sed -e 's/\\s\\+/,/g'`;
for (@process_table)
{       chomp;
        $_ =~ s/        / /g;
        my ($user,$pid,$cpu,$mem,$cmd)=(split /,/,$_)[0,1,2,3,10];
        next if $user eq 'USER';
        if($cpu > 10)
        {
                push(@stats,"$user - WARNING(CPU:$cpu):\t$pid($cmd)\n");
        }
        if($cpu > 50)
        {
                push(@stats,"$user - CRITICAL(CPU:$cpu):\t$pid($cmd)\n");
        }
}
print $_ for @stats;
share|improve this question
    
Looks like you are off to a good start. Now what is your actual question? –  Martin Sep 25 '13 at 17:23
    
I think I just need to have a hash for each user with each process string as a key, if key exists add processor usage to the value of that key. I just don't know how to facilitate that. This prints out each process for all processes, I need to add up all the usage for httpd as one string and total httpd per user basically, but not just httpd, it needs to be dynamic for any process running by any user. –  ThatGuy Sep 25 '13 at 17:23
    
Look at my desired outlook and compare to ps stats above it. –  ThatGuy Sep 25 '13 at 17:25
    
A hash is usually the datatype you are looking for when you need to lookup something by value in perl. In your case you a most likely looking at a hash of hashes. The outer hash using the user as key and another hash as its value. The second hash will then have a process name as value. Any good book or tutorial on perl will cover hashes –  Martin Sep 25 '13 at 17:37

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I added the %users hash-of-hashes to your code. See also: perldoc perldsc

use warnings;
use strict;

my @stats;
my $date=`date +"\%m-\%d-\%Y-\%r"`;
chomp $date;

my %users;
my @process_table = `ps aux --sort=\%cpu|sed -e 's/\\s\\+/,/g'`;
for (@process_table)
{       chomp;
        $_ =~ s/        / /g;
        my ($user,$pid,$cpu,$mem,$cmd)=(split /,/,$_)[0,1,2,3,10];
        next if $user eq 'USER';
        $users{$user}{$cmd} += $cpu;
        if($cpu > 10)
        {
                push(@stats,"$user - WARNING(CPU:$cpu):\t$pid($cmd)\n");
        }
        if($cpu > 50)
        {
                push(@stats,"$user - CRITICAL(CPU:$cpu):\t$pid($cmd)\n");
        }
}
print $_ for @stats;
for my $user (sort keys %users) {
    print "$user\n";
    print "($users{$user}{$_}): $_\n" for (sort keys %{ $users{$user} });
    print "\n";
}
share|improve this answer
    
That almost did it!! The only thing it did not combine like process names and add usage so northriv (0.2): /usr/local/apache2/bin/httpd (0.3): /usr/local/apache2/bin/httpd (0.2): /usr/local/apache2/bin/httpd (0.2): /usr/local/apache2/bin/httpd (0.3): /usr/local/apache2/bin/httpd (0.4): /usr/local/apache2/bin/httpd (0.2): /usr/local/apache2/bin/httpd (0.0): /usr/local/mysql/bin/mysqld –  ThatGuy Sep 25 '13 at 17:38
    
Should be northriv (1.8): /usr/local/apache2/bin/httpd (0.0): /usr/local/mysql/bin/mysqld Also, is there a way to add another bracket set for memory too like northriv (1.8): /usr/local/apache2/bin/httpd (0.0): /usr/local/mysql/bin/mysqld –  ThatGuy Sep 25 '13 at 17:40
    
Sorry no line breaks :/ –  ThatGuy Sep 25 '13 at 17:41
    
I updated my Answer. –  toolic Sep 25 '13 at 18:17
    
You sir are a scholar. Thanks a ton, I can prob figure out how to add add another () set for memory. Thanks a ton! –  ThatGuy Sep 25 '13 at 18:21

You should use P9Y::ProcessTable module for this task.

share|improve this answer
    
I already have all the proper data from my ps command, and even parse out the right fields, I think I just need to have a hash for each user with each process string as a key, if key exists add processor usage to the value of that key. I just don't know how to facilitate that. –  ThatGuy Sep 25 '13 at 17:22
2  
@ThatGuy, don't discount this advice too quickly. You may be happy today with what you've done, but there may come a day when you don't want to rely on 1) a specific distribution's implementation of 2) an external command that you run 3) via your system's shell 4) from a location subject to the PATH environment variable. When that day comes you may want to use a tested/maintained module –  tjd Sep 25 '13 at 18:50

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