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I would like to know, if there is a difference between pushing from your local repo to remote repo, directly into a master and first to do checkout remote then push that remote into master? Because, yesterday I pushed a new branch to master, however it had some bugs and I would like to know if this can be fixed and if it is the same as pushing directly to master.

edit:

Say there is a master branch, I cloned a repo from this branch, then I modify this repo and push it to the master directly.

the second scenario is I create a new branch git checkout -b new_branch

then git push new_branch master

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can you please clarify what two commands you are comparing (by editing the question to include them)? –  AD7six Sep 25 '13 at 17:17
    
@AD7six there, I added some examples –  ANW Sep 25 '13 at 17:20
    
Both of those operations sound the same to me. –  Carl Norum Sep 25 '13 at 17:20
    
So they are equally difficult to reverse if you pushed a bugy code? And do they get merged to master instantly? –  ANW Sep 25 '13 at 17:27
    
it makes absolutely no difference either way: all you've done is choose a different name for your local branch, and lose the remote tracking behaviour. The effect on the remote repo is identical. –  Useless Sep 25 '13 at 17:34
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1 Answer

... yesterday I pushed a new branch to master ...

But master is the name of a branch. Are you trying to say you forcibly updated it to a different branch? Can you show the command you used?

Say there is a master branch, I cloned a repo from this branch ...

No, you cloned the repo and the cloned master branch was checked out. If you edit your local master branch, pushing will update the remote one (see below).

If you create a new branch for some reason, and force the remote master to copy that, all you've done is leave your local copy of master behind.


1. Use local master

$ git clone Repo
$ cd Repo
$ git checkout master

the remote and local repos have the same master. After making changes:

$ ... make changes ...
$ git commit -a

your local repo has a new commit, and your local master branch points to it.

$ git push

Now the remote repo's master branch has been updated to match yours, and the new commit has been sent.


2. Use a different local branch

$ git clone Repo
$ cd Repo
$ git checkout master
$ git checkout -b new_branch

the remote and local repos have the same master, but you also have a local branch. After making changes:

$ ... make changes ...
$ git commit -a

your local repo has a new commit, and your local branch points to it (neither master has moved).

$ git push new_branch master

advances the remote master to the same commit you added to your new local branch, without affecting your local master.

The only difference is that your local master is now behind the remote (pull will update it), and you have a local branch which no-one else can see, and which changed nothing in the remote repo.

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